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Here’s How to Make Monkey Bread With Your Kids

The store-bought ingredients in this recipe make it simple enough for the kids to get hands-on in the kitchen. This is how to make monkey bread together!

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I think my kids like saying “monkey bread” as much as I like hearing them pronounce cinnamon as cimmanin. My 6-year-old was endlessly curious about why it’s called monkey bread, and wouldn’t stop asking until I Googled it. Turns out, it’s meant to be eaten like a monkey, pulling apart the sticky pieces with your hands.

I’ve got to admit—I cook a lot, but have never made monkey bread. I’ve tasted (and loved) it in our Test Kitchen, shared it with my mom at a local brunch spot, but never made it myself.

When to Make This Recipe

I intended to let this rise overnight to bake one morning, but kitchen projects with young kids late in the day are tough when bedtime is an hour after you’ve made dinner (and maybe not cleaned up yet). I wanted to make sure we’re not all eating caramelly, sticky monkey bread willy-nilly. No sir, this is a morning treat.

In reality, we started making this around 10 a.m. That made it the perfect dessert after lunch.

By the way—read this before you start baking with kids.

How to Make Monkey Bread

This recipe is from Diana Kunselman in Pennsylvania. It makes 16 servings—about enough for a hungry family of four.

Ingredients

  • 2 loaves (1 pound each) frozen bread dough, thawed
  • 1 cup packed brown sugar
  • 3/4 cup butter, cubed
  • 1 package (3 ounces) cook-and-serve vanilla pudding mix
  • 2 tablespoons 2% milk
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon

Editor’s Tip: Feel free to use a homemade bread dough or biscuit dough here,

Tools You’ll Need

Rustle up a 13×9-inch pan, parchment paper, a saucepan, a whisk, a rubber or silicone spatula and a garden hose. Your kids are going to get sticky!

Instructions

Step 1: Kids prep the dough, grownups prep the pan

This simple recipe starts with dividing the dough into 1-inch pieces and placing them in a greased 13×9-inch pan.

I used two different kinds of store-bought dough because these are strange times and that’s what the store had: pizza dough and biscuit dough. I’ve got to tell you, the biscuit dough made my absolute favorite pieces. The flakiness of the biscuit dough makes the pull-apart texture even better.

You can amuse your kids with the pop of the dough tube opening, then show them the magic inside. My kids wanted to tear apart the dough themselves. So I let them. They tore pieces that were pretty tiny, but I quite liked that because it gave the monkey bread: A) smaller serving sizes and B) more crispy edges.

Step 2: Kids mix, grownups simmer and pour

Measure the remaining ingredients before the kids join in, if you prefer order to chaos. I was out of brown sugar, but I made my own with a quick baking substitution.

Let the kids add the ingredients to the saucepan before it gets hot. Bring to a boil; grownups cook and stir 1 minute. Remove from the heat and pour over dough pieces.

Step 3: Wait, then bake

Cover your pan with parchment or foil and let raise in a warm spot for 45 minutes. Turn the kids’ attention to lunch, home learning or, if you have a magic wand, the dishes.

This bread rises longer than it bakes. I let it rise in my oven for about 40 minutes on the “proof” setting. I took it out before time was up so that I could preheat the oven to 350° and get this bad boy done as soon as possible. (Once you smell the sauce, you’ll understand.)

Bake, uncovered, for 20-25 minutes. You can invert the whole pan immediately onto a serving dish, or skip this step to avoid dirtying another dish. It’s perfectly delicious no matter your angle of attack.

How to Customize This Recipe

Don’t stress over the ingredients. If you don’t have vanilla pudding mix, fine. Use butterscotch, banana or even chocolate pudding mix. You can also skip the pudding mix altogether—you’ll have a thinner, more buttery sauce.

Use your favorite dough, store-bought or otherwise. I wholeheartedly recommend biscuit dough, as its buttery, flaky layers brought a lovely texture to the party. You could even use cinnamon roll dough—my family prefers this monkey bread sauce to the vanilla frosting that comes with cimmanin rolls, anyway.

Make the texture extra fun by adding chopped nuts to the sauce. Top with banana slices to really drive the “monkey” theme home for your kids. Blueberries bake up nicely with a recipe like this, though you may want to have extra napkins ready.

How to Store Your Monkey Bread

It’s cliche when it comes to recipes, but I really doubt there’ll be anything left after those little hands get ahold of this one. You can seal leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for 3 days. It’s really best enjoyed fresh and warm, so recreate the magic by microwaving portions for 30 seconds or less.

Find More Fun Things to Bake with Kids

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Heartless Indian Villagers Hang Monkey To Death From Tree To Teach Its Troop A “Lesson”

WARNING: THE CONTENT BELOW MAY BE DISTRESSING FOR SOME OF YOU!

Distressing videos and images that were shared with the public show Indian villagers hanging a struggling monkey from a tree to teach its troops a lesson.

According to reports, the villagers wanted the troop of the monkey to stay away from the livestock.

The incident happened in Telangana, a southern Indian state.

The villagers reportedly chased the monkeys that were terrorizing their village, however, one of them fell in a pond.

The thugs captured the monkey and hang it from a tree so it could teach the troop of the monkey a lesson.

In the disturbing video, the men allowed their dogs to nip at the monkey as it struggled to breathe air.

The monkey could be seen trying to free itself as it slowly lost its life.

Despite the horrible thing happening in front of them, local villagers cheered as the monkey died in front of them.

A video of the incident was shared on social media, and after it went viral, authorities have launched an official investigation.

A Venkateswarlu, a Forest Ranger in Telangana, released a statement about the incident, where he said:

The perpetrators, who admitted their guilt, are being booked under the Wildlife Protection Act. The accused wanted to scare other monkeys by hanging the one which was caught. We found the carcass in a decomposed state.

The Forest Ranger also said that they have received a lot of complaints about monkeys in the area.

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Three men behind viral monkey killing video arrested in Telangana

The three men, who tortured and killed a monkey and released the video on social media, were later granted bail.

Days after a video of a monkey being hanged to death from a tree in Khammam district went viral, three people have been arrested in connection with the incident.

According to Sathupalli Forest Range Officer A Venkateswarlu, a Preliminary Offence Report (POR) under the Wildlife Protection Act of 1972 was filed against the perpetrators and the accused were arrested on Monday.

According to Forest Department officials, three locals — Sadhu Venkateshwar Rao, Goudelli Ganapathi and Gaddam Rajashekar — killed the monkey after torturing it. 

“As it is a bailable offence they were later granted bail on personal bond,” he said.

The official told PTI that a notice under section 41 (A) of the CrPC (notice of appearance) was also served to them and they have to appear before the forest officials whenever they are asked to do so as part of the investigation.

The incident happened on June 26 at Vemsoor village and the video of the primate being hanged using a rope went viral, prompting the officials to investigate.

The horrific visuals that went viral showed two dogs attacking the monkey while three men holding sticks were overseeing the entire episode. The prime accused Venkateshwar Rao hit the monkey with a stick after it came near his residence in an agricultural field. One of the three men recorded the act on the phone and shared it on social media.

Forest officials said the accused wanted to scare other monkeys by hanging the one which was caught. The officials found the carcass of the monkey in a decomposed state.

Meanwhile, the Federation of Indian Animal Protection Organisations (FIAPO) condemned the brutal killing of the monkey.

The apex animal rights organisation in a statement said it has reached out to government authorities including Union Environment Minister Prakash Javadekar and Telangana Chief Minister K Chandrasekhar Rao seeking stringent action against the culprits as per law.

“We cannot continue to call these heinous incidents, just acts of cruelty. These are criminal acts of violence involving torture and abuse against sentient, free, wild animals. The Prevention of Cruelty Act is woefully inadequate to deal with such violence. We need a new law that punishes violent crimes against animals. Revisiting the penalties is important too. Animals should be #EqualBeforeTheLaw,” Varda Mehrotra, Executive Director, FIAPO, said.

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Brazil Monkey Deaths Signal Spread of Viruses


By Jan Rocha

Scientists in Brazil believe that global warming and climate change have created conditions that favour the reproduction of the mosquitoes that transmit viruses such as yellow fever, now spreading through previously immune regions of Brazil.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change suggests that an increase of 4°C in mean annual temperatures is possible in these south and central regions because of warming caused by carbon dioxide concentrations.

The yellow fever virus can be transmitted to humans and to monkeys, and thousands of monkeys − some from endangered species − have died in the last four months.

Most of the deaths have been caused by the virus, but some monkeys have been shot or clubbed to death by Brazilians who erroneously believe that they, and not the mosquitoes, are responsible for transmitting the virus to humans.

The woolly spider monkey (muriqui), and the brown howler monkey (bugio) are the species most affected.

Sérgio Lucena, a primatologist and zoology professor at the Federal University of Espírito Santo, says that, in fact, monkeys are sentinels because they die before humans. “If the virus begins to propagate in a determined area, the death of monkeys sends us a warning.”

Encourage viruses

Since January, the yellow fever virus has claimed nearly 2,000 human victims, 300 of them fatal, in a region of Brazil where it had been eliminated in the 1940s.

The epidemic began in the state of Minas Gerais last December, and since then it has spread to the neighbouring states of Espirito Santo, Rio, São Paulo and Bahia. Vaccination campaigns are now under way.

The virus, which is transmitted by the haemagogus mosquito, is normally confined to the tropical regions in the north of Brazil.

José Cássio de Moraes, an epidemiologist at the Santa Casa hospital in São Paulo, says that intense deforestation, the chaotic urbanisation of rural areas and climate change have worked together to encourage the spread of viruses such as yellow fever − not only in Brazil, but in many other countries.

“Changes in ecosystems, global warming, intense rains, heat – all this facilitates the spread of disease by vectors [disease transmitters].”

“When the trees are destroyed and another primate,
the human being, appears, this haemogogus
mosquito will substitute the man for the monkey”

So far, the cases in the southeast region of Brazil have occurred in rural areas with woods and forests. But officials are worried because many of these areas are not far from major urban centres such as Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo.

Tens of millions of people live in these areas, where the city-dwelling aedes aegypti mosquitoes could start the spread of the disease in a human-to-human cycle, according to Dr Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

These mosquitoes are already responsible for the transmission of the dengue, Zika and chikungunya viruses, which have claimed thousands of victims in Brazil in the last few years.

Although there is a highly effective vaccine for yellow fever, it is not routinely given in the major urban centres.

Sérgio Lucena is one of a group of scientists in Brazil who have begun to study the relationship between the present epidemic and the degradation of the environment.

Fragments of forest

He explains: “Monkeys live in the canopies of the trees. The cycle is restricted to there. But when the trees are destroyed and another primate, the human being, appears, this haemogogus mosquito will substitute the man for the monkey.”

Over the years, deforestation has left different species of monkey surviving in very small fragments of forest, and Lucena says: “Impoverished ecological systems can favour the growth of mosquito populations.”

When virus-carrying mosquitoes find large populations of monkeys in isolated areas of the Atlantic Forest − which once covered the entire eastern coastline of Brazil, but is now reduced to under 10% of its original size − they thrive. And when there are no more monkeys to infect, they turn to other victims – humans.

Deforestation also impoverishes the surviving forest. Where there is plenty of fruit and shade, without pollution, the monkeys are healthier, stress-free, with a more efficient immune system, and better able to resist viruses.

Dr Moraes warns that if the continuing worldwide urban expansion into rural areas is not controlled, the changes could bring not only an increase in cases of yellow fever but also of other diseases transmitted by vectors, such as leishmaniasis and malaria. – Climate News Network

Previously published on climatenewsnetwork.net and is republished here under a Creative Commons license.

***

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NBCUniversal’s Monkey Kingdom Inks Development Deal With YouTuber MC Grammar

NBCUniversal International Studios’ UK production outfit Monkey Kingdom has signed a development deal with educational YouTuber MC Grammar.

Monkey will work with school teacher Jacob Mitchell to create animated and live-action content after he went viral for rapping children’s book The Gruffalo and later appeared on The Ellen DeGeneres Show.

Represented by Encanta Talent Management, MC Grammar teams learning with music and broadcasts live weekly sessions on his YouTube channel, to inspire kids to read and fall in love with books.

Commenting on the Monkey partnership, Mitchell said it was “an instant meeting of the minds.” He added: “Together we will educate, entertain and empower young minds across the world.”

Monkey creative director David Granger added: “We’ve always loved creating formats around music. So, we’re thrilled with the opportunity to work with Jacob, and to build on his extraordinary ability to inspire and entertain not just kids, but also their parents and teachers.”

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Monkey hanged to death in Telangana, gut-wrenching incident sparks angry reactions

In yet another incident of animal brutality, a group of people in a village in Telangana beat up and hanged a monkey to death after it entered a home looking for food. A gut-wrenching video of the incident has since gone viral and prompted a flood of angry reactions on Twitter, with many asking for justice for the animal.

The incident took place in Ammapalem village in Telangana’s Khammam district. A video of the sickening incident which has surfaced on social media shows the monkey hanging by a rope, flailing its arms desperately in an attempt to free itself. Dogs were left to attack the monkey.

The video has left people shocked and many are taking to Twitter to share their outrage over the incident.

“Such an inhuman, brutal and shameful act. Don’t know where these humans are heading towards,” wrote a Twitter user.

Ammapalem resident Venkateshwar Rao and other accused have been charged by forest officials under the Wildlife Protection Act. They were arrested and released on bail on Saturday. They are yet to be summoned for questioning.

Rao had spotted the monkey at his home and beat it with a stick. He then hung it from a tree with the help of his friend.

In the video of the incident, Rao can be seen instructing his pet dogs to bite the monkey while it fought for its life.

(With ANI Inputs)

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Monkey Hanged To Death In Telangana To ‘Send A Message’ To Other Monkeys Causing Problems

Just in the last couple of months, we’ve seen some of the worst crimes humans have committed against defenceless animals and those were just the few that someone managed to document. There are probably so many cases that we never even get to know about and the poor animal never gets the justice it deserves. Adding to the long list of reasons why humans are actually trash, the new incident to cause widespread outrage – and rightly so – is the hanging of a monkey.

A video of the horrific incident was being shared online and it shows the monkey struggling while hanging from a noose. A visual like that is enough to make everyone recoil and question if there’s actually any humanity left in the world. The answer to that last question is no, from what I’ve seen.

This is intentionally cruel, they’re torturing the monkey. Reportedly, this incident took place on June 26 in Telangana’s Khammam when a troop of monkeys entered the area and the people there decided to set an example and teach them a lesson. This was apparently done as a way to send a message to all the other monkeys and scare them. 

Talking to PTI, Sathupalli Forest Range Officer A Venkateswarlu said, “The perpetrators, who admitted their guilt, are being booked under the Wildlife Protection Act. The accused wanted to scare other monkeys by hanging the one which was caught. We found the carcass in a decomposed state. The accused are being booked under the Wildlife Protection Act.”

At least the poor monkey will get some justice but we all know, we’ve all seen that nothing is going to change. So many people commit such heinous crimes against animals because they know there will be no consequences.

An eye for an eye?

Fair demands.

We really do.

Set an example with them, much like what they were doing with the monkey.

RIP.

Yes.

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Monkey Hanged to Death in Telangana’s Khammam, Horrific Video Sparks Social Media Uproar; Netizens Say ‘Humans Are the Most Dangerous’

Hyderabad: Yet again, another case of horrific animal cruelty has surfaced on social media, making us wonder ‘who’s really the animal’ here? Also Read – PETA India Documents Cruelty to Jallikattu Bulls in Tamil Nadu, Urges Supreme Court to Strike Down The Sport

In a case of extreme brutality, a monkey was hanged to death from a tree by three people in Khammam district of Telangana in a bid to scare other simians. The incident happened on June 26 when a troop of monkeys entered the area, following which locals decided to teach them a lesson. One of the men said that that monkeys would be scared if one of them is killed.

When one of the monkeys fell into a water tubewell, one accused caught hold of it and hanged him to death. He also made his pet dogs bite the monkey while the monkey was fighting for its life. What’s more, is that no one raised any objection, and in fact, a few of them cheered as well!

The video of the monkey being hanged using a rope has gone viral, infuriating citizens who have demanded immediate arrest of the perpetrators.

(Warning: Viewers’ discretion, disturbing visuals)

“The perpetrators, who admitted their guilt, are being booked under the Wildlife Protection Act,” Sathupalli Forest Range Officer A Venkateswarlu told PTI.

“The accused wanted to scare other monkeys by hanging the one which was caught. We found the carcass in a decomposed state. The accused are being booked under the Wildlife Protection Act,” he further said.

According to Venkateswarlu, people at Sathupalli and surrounding areas are suffering from monkey menace with the simians raiding the orchards giving sleepless nights to the locals.

But, is violence the answer?

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‘Sex-crazed’ monkey attacks a woman while others rob a man and child on the streets of Thai city over-run by violent macaques

Thousands of sex-crazed monkeys continue to cause havoc in the Thai city of Lopburi by attacking locals and stealing property.  

The 6,000 macaques running free in the city were previously tolerated by locals as it helped to attract tourists who paid good money to feed them fruit and take pictures. 

But lockdowns have stopped the tourists from coming which means the monkeys are running short on supplies, with new footage showing them turn violent and leaving locals struggling to keep control.

One monkey can be seen attacking a woman by jumping at her and pulling her by the hair, while another video shows a monkey casually stealing a protective facemask from a young boy.

Macaques monkeys are still causing havoc in the Thai city of as footage of the 'sex-crazed' pests shows them attacking a woman. The monkeys are used to being fed by tourists, but with lockdown resulting in fewer people visiting Lopburi, they are becoming more erratic in their behaviour

Macaques monkeys are still causing havoc in the Thai city of as footage of the 'sex-crazed' pests shows them attacking a woman. The monkeys are used to being fed by tourists, but with lockdown resulting in fewer people visiting Lopburi, they are becoming more erratic in their behaviour

Macaques monkeys are still causing havoc in the Thai city of Lopburi as footage of the ‘sex-crazed’ pests shows them attacking a woman

Another monkey climbed up a young boy and stole his protective facemask (pictured). There are believed to be 6,000 macaques roaming around Lopburi, which has a human population of 750,000

Another monkey climbed up a young boy and stole his protective facemask (pictured). There are believed to be 6,000 macaques roaming around Lopburi, which has a human population of 750,000

Another monkey climbed up a young boy and stole his protective facemask (pictured). There are believed to be 6,000 macaques roaming around Lopburi, which has a human population of 750,000

Meanwhile, several monkeys were seen bathing in a local pool in Lopburi, as temperatures can reach 35 degrees celsius in the Thai city, while others have forcibly taken food from the back of the cars of locals. 

People have sought to appease them with junk food, but the sugary diet has turned them sex-crazed and that they are now breeding faster than before. 

As a result, locals have resorted to giving the monkeys watermelon and other foods such as sweetcorn in order to calm them down.

Monkeys have been seen fighting with each other as they scrap for any food they can find caused by the lack of tourists coming into Lopburi to feed them. 

Areas of the city have become no-go zones, with one abandoned cinema serving as the macaques’ headquarters – and cemetery of their warrior kings.

Dead monkeys are laid to rest by their peers in the projection room in the cinema’s rear and any human who enters is attacked by the vicious hoards. 

Separate footage saw a monkey steal a bag of sweetcorn from the hands of a local (pictured). The monkeys are used to being fed by tourists, but with lockdown resulting in fewer people visiting Lopburi, they are becoming more erratic in their behaviour

Separate footage saw a monkey steal a bag of sweetcorn from the hands of a local (pictured). The monkeys are used to being fed by tourists, but with lockdown resulting in fewer people visiting Lopburi, they are becoming more erratic in their behaviour

Separate footage saw a monkey steal a bag of sweetcorn from the hands of a local (pictured). The monkeys are used to being fed by tourists, but with lockdown resulting in fewer people visiting Lopburi, they are becoming more erratic in their behaviour

The macaques were also spotted bathing in a public swimming pool in Lopburi (pictured). Temperatures rose up to 35 degrees celsius last week

The macaques were also spotted bathing in a public swimming pool in Lopburi (pictured). Temperatures rose up to 35 degrees celsius last week

The macaques were also spotted bathing in a public swimming pool in Lopburi (pictured). Temperatures rose up to 35 degrees celsius last week

The monkeys have also been jumping into the back of cars and stealing property and food from the locals' vehicles  (pictured)

The monkeys have also been jumping into the back of cars and stealing property and food from the locals' vehicles  (pictured)

The monkeys have also been jumping into the back of cars and stealing property and food from the locals’ vehicles  (pictured)

A troop of macaques invades a shop. People have sought to appease them with junk food, but the sugary diet has turned them sex-crazed and that they are now breeding faster than before.

A troop of macaques invades a shop. People have sought to appease them with junk food, but the sugary diet has turned them sex-crazed and that they are now breeding faster than before.

A troop of macaques invades a shop. People have sought to appease them with junk food, but the sugary diet has turned them sex-crazed and that they are now breeding faster than before.

Lockdowns have stopped the tourists from coming which means the monkeys are running short on supplies, turning them violent and leaving locals struggling to keep control.

Lockdowns have stopped the tourists from coming which means the monkeys are running short on supplies, turning them violent and leaving locals struggling to keep control.

Lockdowns have stopped the tourists from coming which means the monkeys are running short on supplies, turning them violent and leaving locals struggling to keep control.

Monkeys watch anxiously as some of their number are captured and taken to be castrated. Wildlife department officers lure the animals into cages with fruit and take them to a clinic where they are anaesthetised, sterilised and left with a tattoo to mark their neutering.

Monkeys watch anxiously as some of their number are captured and taken to be castrated. Wildlife department officers lure the animals into cages with fruit and take them to a clinic where they are anaesthetised, sterilised and left with a tattoo to mark their neutering.

Monkeys watch anxiously as some of their number are captured and taken to be castrated. Wildlife department officers lure the animals into cages with fruit and take them to a clinic where they are anaesthetised, sterilised and left with a tattoo to mark their neutering.

A marauding macaque who has invaded a local shop grips a juice carton in its teeth. The fearless species rules the streets around the Prang Sam Yod temple in the centre of Lopburi, patrolling the tops of walls and brazenly ripping the rubber seals from car doors.

A marauding macaque who has invaded a local shop grips a juice carton in its teeth. The fearless species rules the streets around the Prang Sam Yod temple in the centre of Lopburi, patrolling the tops of walls and brazenly ripping the rubber seals from car doors.

A marauding macaque who has invaded a local shop grips a juice carton in its teeth. The fearless species rules the streets around the Prang Sam Yod temple in the centre of Lopburi, patrolling the tops of walls and brazenly ripping the rubber seals from car doors.

Litter is strewn across the city and the stench of their excrement is unbearable when it rains. Their growing numbers - doubling in three years - have made an uneasy coexistence with their human peers almost intolerable. Many areas have simply been surrendered to the marauding monkeys.

Litter is strewn across the city and the stench of their excrement is unbearable when it rains. Their growing numbers - doubling in three years - have made an uneasy coexistence with their human peers almost intolerable. Many areas have simply been surrendered to the marauding monkeys.

Litter is strewn across the city and the stench of their excrement is unbearable when it rains. Their growing numbers – doubling in three years – have made an uneasy coexistence with their human peers almost intolerable. Many areas have simply been surrendered to the marauding monkeys.

Lopburi is home to some 6,000 macaques which were a major tourist draw before lockdown stopped visitors from coming - but have now turned into a menace for locals

Lopburi is home to some 6,000 macaques which were a major tourist draw before lockdown stopped visitors from coming - but have now turned into a menace for locals

Lopburi is home to some 6,000 macaques which were a major tourist draw before lockdown stopped visitors from coming – but have now turned into a menace for locals

Residents say that without tourists to feed the monkeys they have turned violent, attacking people and each-other in an increasingly desperate search for food

Residents say that without tourists to feed the monkeys they have turned violent, attacking people and each-other in an increasingly desperate search for food

Residents say that without tourists to feed the monkeys they have turned violent, attacking people and each-other in an increasingly desperate search for food

In March the primates were pictured getting into a mass brawl over bananas after the supply dwindles.   

The fearless species rules the streets around the Prang Sam Yod temple in the centre of Lopburi, patrolling the tops of walls and brazenly ripping the rubber seals from car doors. 

Pointing to the overhead netting covering her terrace, Kuljira Taechawattanawanna feels like a prisoner in her own home. ‘We live in a cage but the monkeys live outside,’ she says.

‘Their excrement is everywhere, the smell is unbearable especially when it rains.’

A government sterilisation campaign is now being waged against the creatures after the epidemic provoked an unexpected change in their behaviour.

Footage of hundreds of them brawling over food in the streets went vira l on social media in March.

Their growing numbers – doubling in three years – have made an uneasy coexistence with their human peers almost intolerable. Many areas have simply been surrendered to the marauding monkeys. 

Some locals have taken to feeding the monkeys junk food in order to keep the fragile peace, but others claim this has turned the animals sex-crazed and means they are breeding faster than before

Some locals have taken to feeding the monkeys junk food in order to keep the fragile peace, but others claim this has turned the animals sex-crazed and means they are breeding faster than before

Some locals have taken to feeding the monkeys junk food in order to keep the fragile peace, but others claim this has turned the animals sex-crazed and means they are breeding faster than before

The monkeys have also started taking over abandoned properties in the city. A cinema that has long been derelict now acts as their base, and even contains a burial ground in a projection room - with anyone who enters attacked

The monkeys have also started taking over abandoned properties in the city. A cinema that has long been derelict now acts as their base, and even contains a burial ground in a projection room - with anyone who enters attacked

The monkeys have also started taking over abandoned properties in the city. A cinema that has long been derelict now acts as their base, and even contains a burial ground in a projection room – with anyone who enters attacked

Residents of Lopburi have taken to putting bars across their windows to stop the monkeys getting in, claiming they are forced to live in cages while the animals have free roam of the streets

Residents of Lopburi have taken to putting bars across their windows to stop the monkeys getting in, claiming they are forced to live in cages while the animals have free roam of the streets

Residents of Lopburi have taken to putting bars across their windows to stop the monkeys getting in, claiming they are forced to live in cages while the animals have free roam of the streets

A macaque pulls at a sign warning people not to feed the monkeys, advice that some locals have been ignoring in an attempt to stop them fighting

A macaque pulls at a sign warning people not to feed the monkeys, advice that some locals have been ignoring in an attempt to stop them fighting

A macaque pulls at a sign warning people not to feed the monkeys, advice that some locals have been ignoring in an attempt to stop them fighting

A monkey pulls a rubber strip off the roof of a car in Lopburi - an incident that residents say is becoming more frequent now there are no tourists to occupy them

A monkey pulls a rubber strip off the roof of a car in Lopburi - an incident that residents say is becoming more frequent now there are no tourists to occupy them

A monkey pulls a rubber strip off the roof of a car in Lopburi – an incident that residents say is becoming more frequent now there are no tourists to occupy them

With no visitors to occupy their time or feed them, the monkeys are increasingly causing problems for locals who say they are becoming increasingly aggressive

With no visitors to occupy their time or feed them, the monkeys are increasingly causing problems for locals who say they are becoming increasingly aggressive

With no visitors to occupy their time or feed them, the monkeys are increasingly causing problems for locals who say they are becoming increasingly aggressive

Nearby, a shop owner displays stuffed tiger and crocodile toys to try to scare off the monkeys, who regularly snatch spray-paint cans from his store.

No one in Lopburi seems to remember a time without the monkeys, with some speculating that the urban creep into nearby forest displaced the simians into the city.

Residents have taken it upon themselves to feed the macaques to prevent clashes.

But locals say the sugary diet of fizzy drinks, cereal and sweets has fuelled their sex lives.

‘The more they eat, the more energy they have… so they breed more,’ says Pramot Ketampai, who manages the Prang Sam Yod temple’s surrounding shrines. 

Locals eating on the street are watched over by longtailed macaques which have been left hungry after tourists vanished

Locals eating on the street are watched over by longtailed macaques which have been left hungry after tourists vanished

Locals eating on the street are watched over by longtailed macaques which have been left hungry after tourists vanished

A macaque eats a piece of Chinese cabbage outside a shop in Lopburi after being fed by a local trying to keep the peace

A macaque eats a piece of Chinese cabbage outside a shop in Lopburi after being fed by a local trying to keep the peace

A macaque eats a piece of Chinese cabbage outside a shop in Lopburi after being fed by a local trying to keep the peace

An abandoned shop has been taken over by monkeys, where they will sleep, breed, and even go to die after locals discovered what appeared to be a 'burial ground' inside a cinema

An abandoned shop has been taken over by monkeys, where they will sleep, breed, and even go to die after locals discovered what appeared to be a 'burial ground' inside a cinema

An abandoned shop has been taken over by monkeys, where they will sleep, breed, and even go to die after locals discovered what appeared to be a ‘burial ground’ inside a cinema

The macaques’ mob fights have drawn the attention of authorities, who restarted a sterilisation programme this month after a three-year pause.

Wildlife department officers lure the animals into cages with fruit and take them to a clinic where they are anaesthetised, sterilised and left with a tattoo to mark their neutering.

They aim to process 500 of the creatures by Friday. 

A sign put up to warn tourists about the monkeys now serves as a grim reminder to locals who have been left to deal with the increasingly violent animals after visitors stopped coming

A sign put up to warn tourists about the monkeys now serves as a grim reminder to locals who have been left to deal with the increasingly violent animals after visitors stopped coming

A sign put up to warn tourists about the monkeys now serves as a grim reminder to locals who have been left to deal with the increasingly violent animals after visitors stopped coming

A man observes a pack of the animals as they prowl a street corner in the centre of Lopburi where they live

A man observes a pack of the animals as they prowl a street corner in the centre of Lopburi where they live

A man observes a pack of the animals as they prowl a street corner in the centre of Lopburi where they live

Domestic tourists walk around a shrine that is typically thronging with monkeys who were thrown fruit by the visitors, but the stream of food has now dried up

Domestic tourists walk around a shrine that is typically thronging with monkeys who were thrown fruit by the visitors, but the stream of food has now dried up

Domestic tourists walk around a shrine that is typically thronging with monkeys who were thrown fruit by the visitors, but the stream of food has now dried up 

A macaque sits on top of a statue close to Lopburi's main temple, another tourists attraction where they used to collect food

A macaque sits on top of a statue close to Lopburi's main temple, another tourists attraction where they used to collect food

A macaque sits on top of a statue close to Lopburi’s main temple, another tourists attraction where they used to collect food

But the campaign may not be enough to quell their numbers and the department has a long-term plan to build a sanctuary in another part of the city – this will likely be met with resistance from the human residents.

‘We need to do a survey of the people living in the area first,’ said Narongporn Daudduem from the wildlife department.

‘It’s like dumping garbage in front of their houses and asking them if they’re happy or not.’

Taweesak Srisaguan, the shop owner in Lopburi who uses stuffed animals as a deterrent to the unwanted monkey visitors, says that despite his daily joust with the creatures, he will miss them if they are moved.

‘I’m used to seeing them walking around, playing on the street,’ he says.

‘If they’re all gone, I’d definitely be lonely.’ 

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Monkey Killed After Being Hung From Tree For Entering House in Telangana

Monkey Killed After Being Hung From Tree For Entering House in Telangana

The men are seen in the video approaching the animal with long sticks. (Representational)

Khammam, Telangana:

In a brutal and sickening example of animal cruelty, a monkey that mistakenly entered a home in search of food was killed after being beaten, hung from a tree and forced to fight for its life against dogs in Telangana’s Khammam district last week.

A video of the shocking incident has emerged on social media and shows the monkey tied to a tree and desperately defending itself against two dogs that appear to be repeatedly urged to kill the poor animal.

After a few moments of this torture several men can be seen approaching the hapless monkey with long sticks.

Forest officials have charged Venkateshwar Rao, a resident of Ammapalem village and whose home the monkey had entered, under the Wildlife Protection Act. Several others identified were similarly charged and arrested.

The accused were released on bail on Saturday and will be summoned for further questioning by officials.

Venkateshwar Rao spotted the monkey in his residence and, in a fit of spite, attacked it with a stick before tying it to a nearby tree with the help of a friend.

In the video he can also be seen instructing his pet dogs to bite the monkey, which was fighting for its life.

With input from ANI