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Neighbors disturbed by stuffed animal monkey seen hanging by rope from tree

SANTA ROSA, California — Shannon Parkhurst was on a walk with her family in her neighborhood on Saturday when she looked up and noticed something disturbing: A stuffed animal monkey hanging by a rope from a tree while holding the American flag.

“We looked up and I was like, ‘Are you kidding?’ There’s a freaking monkey hanging…it looks like a monkey hanging from a noose,” Parkhurst told ABC7 News. “It was really daunting and eerie and weird, it is clearly a racial statement.”

Parkhurst, whose two-year-old son is biracial, was so rattled by the image that she snapped a couple of photos and shared them on Facebook, Nextdoor and with her close friend and neighbor, Jessica Wycliffe, who then reported it to police.

“Why is it on a lever? Why is it attached to a shed? I have a lot of questions about why,” Wycliffe said about the monkey.

Police investigated the incident and told ABC7 News he showed up at the home, where the monkey was hanging and spoke to the residents. He said that, upon inspection, the rope was not a noose. He said the residents offered to remove the monkey, but they are not required to take it down because it is hanging from a tree on their private property.

As of Monday morning, and despite growing concerns from others in the neighborhood who reached out to Parkhurst, the monkey had not been taken down. Instead, Parkhurst and Wycliffe noticed more items were added to it, including a green army man doll and a cardboard cat carrier.

“Seems like they’re kind of trolling and making fun of the people calling about it,” Parkhurst said.

“I don’t know what they’re trying to say,” Wyliffe added. “Honestly, it kind of freaks me out.”

ABC7 News reached a woman by phone who identified herself as the resident of the home where the monkey is hanging. She said they hung it there two weeks ago and that it was “silly” that people reported it.

“It’s just a monkey hanging on a rope,” she said, laughing. “My husband likes to entertain people.”

When asked about the racial connotations, she said that was “not on anybody’s thought process.”

She also said they have no plans to take it down.

“Why should we?” she replied. “The officer said it was our backyard, and we could do whatever we wanted to do.”

The phone call then abruptly ended, and she could not be reached again.

For Parkhurst, her response was even more upsetting.

“What I want the homeowners to know,” she said, “Is that if they would have accepted the community’s view and accepted how it had been offensive and apologized and taken it down, I would have accepted it and felt so happy that we are growing as a community. Instead, they have added to it.”

She said, for now, she plans to avoid walking on the path by their house.

“I don’t want my son to think that’s OK,” she explained. “I don’t want him hanging a monkey from a tree with a flag, saying, ‘Hey, that’s cute and funny,’ and not realizing the racial connotations from it.”

Copyright © 2020 KGO-TV. All Rights Reserved.

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Monkey hanged to death from a tree for entering house in Telangana

In a case of extreme brutality against animals, a monkey was hanged to death from a tree by three people in a bid to scare other simians in Khammam district of Telangana, forest department officials said on Monday (June 29).

“The perpetrators, who admitted their guilt, are being booked under the Wildlife Protection Act,” Sathupalli Forest Range Officer A Venkateswarlu said.

The incident happened on June 26 in Vemsoor village and the video of the primate being hanged using a rope went viral, prompting the officials to investigate.

“The accused wanted to scare other monkeys by hanging the one which was caught.We found the carcass in a decomposed state.

The accused are being booked under the Wildlife Protection Act,” the official told PTI.

According to Venkateswarlu, people at Sathupalli and surrounding areas are suffering from monkey menace with the simians raiding the orchards giving sleepless nights to the locals.

The official said as per a Telangana government directive 30 per cent of the area in Sathupalli forest range during afforestation will have edible wild fruit species to enhance the food base of monkeys and other wild animals so that when they are rehabilitated, there will be sufficient food available. 

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Neighbors disturbed by stuffed animal monkey seen hanging by rope from tree in NorCal home

SANTA ROSA, Calif. — Shannon Parkhurst was on a walk with her family in her NorCal neighborhood of Santa Rosa on Saturday when she looked up and noticed something disturbing: A stuffed animal monkey hanging by a rope from a tree while holding the American flag.

“We looked up and I was like, ‘Are you kidding?’ There’s a freaking monkey hanging…it looks like a monkey hanging from a noose,” Parkhurst told ABC7 News, ABC7’s sister station. “It was really daunting and eerie and weird, it is clearly a racial statement.”

Parkhurst, whose 2-year-old son is biracial, was so rattled by the image that she snapped a couple of photos and shared them on Facebook, Nextdoor and with her close friend and neighbor, Jessica Wycliffe, who then reported it to police.

MORE: Couple draw guns at crowd heading to St. Louis mayor’s home

“Why is it on a lever? Why is it attached to a shed? I have a lot of questions about why,” Wycliffe said about the monkey.

Santa Rosa Police Department Sgt. Hector De Leon investigated the incident and told ABC7 News he showed up at the home near Brush Creek Trail, where the monkey was hanging and spoke to the residents. He said that, upon inspection, the rope was not a noose. He said the residents offered to remove the monkey but that they are not required to take it down because it is hanging from a tree on their private property.

As of Monday morning, and despite growing concerns from others in the neighborhood who reached out to Parkhurst, the monkey had not been taken down. Instead, Parkhurst and Wycliffe noticed more items were added to it, including a green army man doll and a cardboard cat carrier.

“Seems like they’re kind of trolling and making fun of the people calling about it,” Parkhurst said.

“I don’t know what they’re trying to say,” Wyliffe added. “Honestly, it kind of freaks me out.”

MORE: Man fired after blocking Latino man from entering his own apartment building

ABC7 News reached a woman by phone who identified herself as the resident of the home where the monkey is hanging. She said they hung it there two weeks ago and that it was “silly” that people reported it.

“It’s just a monkey hanging on a rope,” she said, laughing. “My husband likes to entertain people.”

When asked about the racial connotations, she said that was “not on anybody’s thought process.”

She also said they have no plans to take it down. “Why should we?” she replied. “The officer said it was our backyard and we could do whatever we wanted to do.”

The phone call then abruptly ended and she could not be reached again.

MORE: Black family’s home vandalized with ‘All Lives Matter’ graffiti

For Parkhurst, her response was even more upsetting.

“What I want the homeowners to know,” she said, “Is that if they would have accepted the community’s view and accepted how it had been offensive and apologized and taken it down, I would have accepted it and felt so happy that we are growing as a community. Instead, they have added to it.”

She said, for now, she plans to avoid walking on the path by their house.

“I don’t want my son to think that’s OK,” she explained. “I don’t want him hanging a monkey from a tree with a flag, saying, ‘Hey, that’s cute and funny,’ and not realizing the racial connotations from it.”

Copyright © 2020 KGO-TV. All Rights Reserved.

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Neighbors disturbed by stuffed animal monkey seen hanging by rope from tree in Santa Rosa home

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Shannon Parkhurst was on a walk with her family in her Santa Rosa neighborhood on Saturday when she looked up and noticed something disturbing: A stuffed animal monkey hanging by a rope from a tree while holding the American flag.

“We looked up and I was like, ‘Are you kidding?’ There’s a freaking monkey hanging…it looks like a monkey hanging from a noose,” Parkhurst told ABC7 News. “It was really daunting and eerie and weird, it is clearly a racial statement.”

Parkhurst, whose two-year-old son is biracial, was so rattled by the image that she snapped a couple of photos and shared them on Facebook, Nextdoor and with her close friend and neighbor, Jessica Wycliffe, who then reported it to police.

TAKE ACTION: Find resources to help with equality, justice and race issues

“Why is it on a lever? Why is it attached to a shed? I have a lot of questions about why,” Wycliffe said about the monkey.

Santa Rosa PD Sergeant Hector De Leon investigated the incident and told ABC7 News he showed up at the home near Brush Creek Trail, where the monkey was hanging and spoke to the residents. He said that, upon inspection, the rope was not a noose. He said the residents offered to remove the monkey but that they are not required to take it down because it is hanging from a tree on their private property.

VIDEO: Oakland neighbors stand in solidarity with Black family after home vandalized with ‘All Lives Matter’ graffiti

As of Monday morning, and despite growing concerns from others in the neighborhood who reached out to Parkhurst, the monkey had not been taken down. Instead, Parkhurst and Wycliffe noticed more items were added to it, including a green army man doll and a cardboard cat carrier.

“Seems like they’re kind of trolling and making fun of the people calling about it,” Parkhurst said.

“I don’t know what they’re trying to say,” Wyliffe added. “Honestly, it kind of freaks me out.”

ABC7 News reached a woman by phone who identified herself as the resident of the home where the monkey is hanging. She said they hung it there two weeks ago and that it was “silly” that people reported it.

“It’s just a monkey hanging on a rope,” she said, laughing. “My husband likes to entertain people.”

VIDEO: Man accused of racism after blocking SF Latino man from entering his own building

When asked about the racial connotations, she said that was “not on anybody’s thought process.”

She also said they have no plans to take it down. “Why should we?” she replied. “The officer said it was our backyard and we could do whatever we wanted to do.”

The phone call then abruptly ended and she could not be reached again.

For Parkhurst, her response was even more upsetting.

“What I want the homeowners to know,” she said, “Is that if they would have accepted the community’s view and accepted how it had been offensive and apologized and taken it down, I would have accepted it and felt so happy that we are growing as a community. Instead, they have added to it.”

She said, for now, she plans to avoid walking on the path by their house.

“I don’t want my son to think that’s OK,” she explained. “I don’t want him hanging a monkey from a tree with a flag, saying, ‘Hey, that’s cute and funny,’ and not realizing the racial connotations from it.”

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Coronavirus Thailand: Monkey attacks woman, others rob locals

Thousands of sex-crazed monkeys continue to cause havoc in the Thai city of Lopburi by attacking locals and stealing property.  

The 6,000 macaques running free in the city were previously tolerated by locals as it helped to attract tourists who paid good money to feed them fruit and take pictures. 

But lockdowns have stopped the tourists from coming which means the monkeys are running short on supplies, with new footage showing them turn violent and leaving locals struggling to keep control.

One monkey can be seen attacking a woman by jumping at her and pulling her by the hair, while another video shows a monkey casually stealing a protective facemask from a young boy.

Macaques monkeys are still causing havoc in the Thai city of as footage of the 'sex-crazed' pests shows them attacking a woman. The monkeys are used to being fed by tourists, but with lockdown resulting in fewer people visiting Lopburi, they are becoming more erratic in their behaviour

Macaques monkeys are still causing havoc in the Thai city of as footage of the 'sex-crazed' pests shows them attacking a woman. The monkeys are used to being fed by tourists, but with lockdown resulting in fewer people visiting Lopburi, they are becoming more erratic in their behaviour

Macaques monkeys are still causing havoc in the Thai city of Lopburi as footage of the ‘sex-crazed’ pests shows them attacking a woman

Another monkey climbed up a young boy and stole his protective facemask (pictured). There are believed to be 6,000 macaques roaming around Lopburi, which has a human population of 750,000

Another monkey climbed up a young boy and stole his protective facemask (pictured). There are believed to be 6,000 macaques roaming around Lopburi, which has a human population of 750,000

Another monkey climbed up a young boy and stole his protective facemask (pictured). There are believed to be 6,000 macaques roaming around Lopburi, which has a human population of 750,000

Meanwhile, several monkeys were seen bathing in a local pool in Lopburi, as temperatures can reach 35 degrees celsius in the Thai city, while others have forcibly taken food from the back of the cars of locals. 

People have sought to appease them with junk food, but the sugary diet has turned them sex-crazed and that they are now breeding faster than before. 

As a result, locals have resorted to giving the monkeys watermelon and other foods such as sweetcorn in order to calm them down.

Monkeys have been seen fighting with each other as they scrap for any food they can find caused by the lack of tourists coming into Lopburi to feed them. 

Areas of the city have become no-go zones, with one abandoned cinema serving as the macaques’ headquarters – and cemetery of their warrior kings.

Dead monkeys are laid to rest by their peers in the projection room in the cinema’s rear and any human who enters is attacked by the vicious hoards. 

Separate footage saw a monkey steal a bag of sweetcorn from the hands of a local (pictured). The monkeys are used to being fed by tourists, but with lockdown resulting in fewer people visiting Lopburi, they are becoming more erratic in their behaviour

Separate footage saw a monkey steal a bag of sweetcorn from the hands of a local (pictured). The monkeys are used to being fed by tourists, but with lockdown resulting in fewer people visiting Lopburi, they are becoming more erratic in their behaviour

Separate footage saw a monkey steal a bag of sweetcorn from the hands of a local (pictured). The monkeys are used to being fed by tourists, but with lockdown resulting in fewer people visiting Lopburi, they are becoming more erratic in their behaviour

The macaques were also spotted bathing in a public swimming pool in Lopburi (pictured). Temperatures rose up to 35 degrees celsius last week

The macaques were also spotted bathing in a public swimming pool in Lopburi (pictured). Temperatures rose up to 35 degrees celsius last week

The macaques were also spotted bathing in a public swimming pool in Lopburi (pictured). Temperatures rose up to 35 degrees celsius last week

The monkeys have also been jumping into the back of cars and stealing property and food from the locals' vehicles  (pictured)

The monkeys have also been jumping into the back of cars and stealing property and food from the locals' vehicles  (pictured)

The monkeys have also been jumping into the back of cars and stealing property and food from the locals’ vehicles  (pictured)

A troop of macaques invades a shop. People have sought to appease them with junk food, but the sugary diet has turned them sex-crazed and that they are now breeding faster than before.

A troop of macaques invades a shop. People have sought to appease them with junk food, but the sugary diet has turned them sex-crazed and that they are now breeding faster than before.

A troop of macaques invades a shop. People have sought to appease them with junk food, but the sugary diet has turned them sex-crazed and that they are now breeding faster than before.

Lockdowns have stopped the tourists from coming which means the monkeys are running short on supplies, turning them violent and leaving locals struggling to keep control.

Lockdowns have stopped the tourists from coming which means the monkeys are running short on supplies, turning them violent and leaving locals struggling to keep control.

Lockdowns have stopped the tourists from coming which means the monkeys are running short on supplies, turning them violent and leaving locals struggling to keep control.

Monkeys watch anxiously as some of their number are captured and taken to be castrated. Wildlife department officers lure the animals into cages with fruit and take them to a clinic where they are anaesthetised, sterilised and left with a tattoo to mark their neutering.

Monkeys watch anxiously as some of their number are captured and taken to be castrated. Wildlife department officers lure the animals into cages with fruit and take them to a clinic where they are anaesthetised, sterilised and left with a tattoo to mark their neutering.

Monkeys watch anxiously as some of their number are captured and taken to be castrated. Wildlife department officers lure the animals into cages with fruit and take them to a clinic where they are anaesthetised, sterilised and left with a tattoo to mark their neutering.

A marauding macaque who has invaded a local shop grips a juice carton in its teeth. The fearless species rules the streets around the Prang Sam Yod temple in the centre of Lopburi, patrolling the tops of walls and brazenly ripping the rubber seals from car doors.

A marauding macaque who has invaded a local shop grips a juice carton in its teeth. The fearless species rules the streets around the Prang Sam Yod temple in the centre of Lopburi, patrolling the tops of walls and brazenly ripping the rubber seals from car doors.

A marauding macaque who has invaded a local shop grips a juice carton in its teeth. The fearless species rules the streets around the Prang Sam Yod temple in the centre of Lopburi, patrolling the tops of walls and brazenly ripping the rubber seals from car doors.

Litter is strewn across the city and the stench of their excrement is unbearable when it rains. Their growing numbers - doubling in three years - have made an uneasy coexistence with their human peers almost intolerable. Many areas have simply been surrendered to the marauding monkeys.

Litter is strewn across the city and the stench of their excrement is unbearable when it rains. Their growing numbers - doubling in three years - have made an uneasy coexistence with their human peers almost intolerable. Many areas have simply been surrendered to the marauding monkeys.

Litter is strewn across the city and the stench of their excrement is unbearable when it rains. Their growing numbers – doubling in three years – have made an uneasy coexistence with their human peers almost intolerable. Many areas have simply been surrendered to the marauding monkeys.

Lopburi is home to some 6,000 macaques which were a major tourist draw before lockdown stopped visitors from coming - but have now turned into a menace for locals

Lopburi is home to some 6,000 macaques which were a major tourist draw before lockdown stopped visitors from coming - but have now turned into a menace for locals

Lopburi is home to some 6,000 macaques which were a major tourist draw before lockdown stopped visitors from coming – but have now turned into a menace for locals

Residents say that without tourists to feed the monkeys they have turned violent, attacking people and each-other in an increasingly desperate search for food

Residents say that without tourists to feed the monkeys they have turned violent, attacking people and each-other in an increasingly desperate search for food

Residents say that without tourists to feed the monkeys they have turned violent, attacking people and each-other in an increasingly desperate search for food

In March the primates were pictured getting into a mass brawl over bananas after the supply dwindles.   

The fearless species rules the streets around the Prang Sam Yod temple in the centre of Lopburi, patrolling the tops of walls and brazenly ripping the rubber seals from car doors. 

Pointing to the overhead netting covering her terrace, Kuljira Taechawattanawanna feels like a prisoner in her own home. ‘We live in a cage but the monkeys live outside,’ she says.

‘Their excrement is everywhere, the smell is unbearable especially when it rains.’

A government sterilisation campaign is now being waged against the creatures after the epidemic provoked an unexpected change in their behaviour.

Footage of hundreds of them brawling over food in the streets went vira l on social media in March.

Their growing numbers – doubling in three years – have made an uneasy coexistence with their human peers almost intolerable. Many areas have simply been surrendered to the marauding monkeys. 

Some locals have taken to feeding the monkeys junk food in order to keep the fragile peace, but others claim this has turned the animals sex-crazed and means they are breeding faster than before

Some locals have taken to feeding the monkeys junk food in order to keep the fragile peace, but others claim this has turned the animals sex-crazed and means they are breeding faster than before

Some locals have taken to feeding the monkeys junk food in order to keep the fragile peace, but others claim this has turned the animals sex-crazed and means they are breeding faster than before

The monkeys have also started taking over abandoned properties in the city. A cinema that has long been derelict now acts as their base, and even contains a burial ground in a projection room - with anyone who enters attacked

The monkeys have also started taking over abandoned properties in the city. A cinema that has long been derelict now acts as their base, and even contains a burial ground in a projection room - with anyone who enters attacked

The monkeys have also started taking over abandoned properties in the city. A cinema that has long been derelict now acts as their base, and even contains a burial ground in a projection room – with anyone who enters attacked

Residents of Lopburi have taken to putting bars across their windows to stop the monkeys getting in, claiming they are forced to live in cages while the animals have free roam of the streets

Residents of Lopburi have taken to putting bars across their windows to stop the monkeys getting in, claiming they are forced to live in cages while the animals have free roam of the streets

Residents of Lopburi have taken to putting bars across their windows to stop the monkeys getting in, claiming they are forced to live in cages while the animals have free roam of the streets

A macaque pulls at a sign warning people not to feed the monkeys, advice that some locals have been ignoring in an attempt to stop them fighting

A macaque pulls at a sign warning people not to feed the monkeys, advice that some locals have been ignoring in an attempt to stop them fighting

A macaque pulls at a sign warning people not to feed the monkeys, advice that some locals have been ignoring in an attempt to stop them fighting

A monkey pulls a rubber strip off the roof of a car in Lopburi - an incident that residents say is becoming more frequent now there are no tourists to occupy them

A monkey pulls a rubber strip off the roof of a car in Lopburi - an incident that residents say is becoming more frequent now there are no tourists to occupy them

A monkey pulls a rubber strip off the roof of a car in Lopburi – an incident that residents say is becoming more frequent now there are no tourists to occupy them

With no visitors to occupy their time or feed them, the monkeys are increasingly causing problems for locals who say they are becoming increasingly aggressive

With no visitors to occupy their time or feed them, the monkeys are increasingly causing problems for locals who say they are becoming increasingly aggressive

With no visitors to occupy their time or feed them, the monkeys are increasingly causing problems for locals who say they are becoming increasingly aggressive

Nearby, a shop owner displays stuffed tiger and crocodile toys to try to scare off the monkeys, who regularly snatch spray-paint cans from his store.

No one in Lopburi seems to remember a time without the monkeys, with some speculating that the urban creep into nearby forest displaced the simians into the city.

Residents have taken it upon themselves to feed the macaques to prevent clashes.

But locals say the sugary diet of fizzy drinks, cereal and sweets has fuelled their sex lives.

‘The more they eat, the more energy they have… so they breed more,’ says Pramot Ketampai, who manages the Prang Sam Yod temple’s surrounding shrines. 

Locals eating on the street are watched over by longtailed macaques which have been left hungry after tourists vanished

Locals eating on the street are watched over by longtailed macaques which have been left hungry after tourists vanished

Locals eating on the street are watched over by longtailed macaques which have been left hungry after tourists vanished

A macaque eats a piece of Chinese cabbage outside a shop in Lopburi after being fed by a local trying to keep the peace

A macaque eats a piece of Chinese cabbage outside a shop in Lopburi after being fed by a local trying to keep the peace

A macaque eats a piece of Chinese cabbage outside a shop in Lopburi after being fed by a local trying to keep the peace

An abandoned shop has been taken over by monkeys, where they will sleep, breed, and even go to die after locals discovered what appeared to be a 'burial ground' inside a cinema

An abandoned shop has been taken over by monkeys, where they will sleep, breed, and even go to die after locals discovered what appeared to be a 'burial ground' inside a cinema

An abandoned shop has been taken over by monkeys, where they will sleep, breed, and even go to die after locals discovered what appeared to be a ‘burial ground’ inside a cinema

The macaques’ mob fights have drawn the attention of authorities, who restarted a sterilisation programme this month after a three-year pause.

Wildlife department officers lure the animals into cages with fruit and take them to a clinic where they are anaesthetised, sterilised and left with a tattoo to mark their neutering.

They aim to process 500 of the creatures by Friday. 

A sign put up to warn tourists about the monkeys now serves as a grim reminder to locals who have been left to deal with the increasingly violent animals after visitors stopped coming

A sign put up to warn tourists about the monkeys now serves as a grim reminder to locals who have been left to deal with the increasingly violent animals after visitors stopped coming

A sign put up to warn tourists about the monkeys now serves as a grim reminder to locals who have been left to deal with the increasingly violent animals after visitors stopped coming

A man observes a pack of the animals as they prowl a street corner in the centre of Lopburi where they live

A man observes a pack of the animals as they prowl a street corner in the centre of Lopburi where they live

A man observes a pack of the animals as they prowl a street corner in the centre of Lopburi where they live

Domestic tourists walk around a shrine that is typically thronging with monkeys who were thrown fruit by the visitors, but the stream of food has now dried up

Domestic tourists walk around a shrine that is typically thronging with monkeys who were thrown fruit by the visitors, but the stream of food has now dried up

Domestic tourists walk around a shrine that is typically thronging with monkeys who were thrown fruit by the visitors, but the stream of food has now dried up 

A macaque sits on top of a statue close to Lopburi's main temple, another tourists attraction where they used to collect food

A macaque sits on top of a statue close to Lopburi's main temple, another tourists attraction where they used to collect food

A macaque sits on top of a statue close to Lopburi’s main temple, another tourists attraction where they used to collect food

But the campaign may not be enough to quell their numbers and the department has a long-term plan to build a sanctuary in another part of the city – this will likely be met with resistance from the human residents.

‘We need to do a survey of the people living in the area first,’ said Narongporn Daudduem from the wildlife department.

‘It’s like dumping garbage in front of their houses and asking them if they’re happy or not.’

Taweesak Srisaguan, the shop owner in Lopburi who uses stuffed animals as a deterrent to the unwanted monkey visitors, says that despite his daily joust with the creatures, he will miss them if they are moved.

‘I’m used to seeing them walking around, playing on the street,’ he says.

‘If they’re all gone, I’d definitely be lonely.’ 

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Monkey hanged to death in Khammam, Telangana; Video sparks furore on social media

Hyderabad: Close on the heels of a Kerala incident in which an elephant died after eating a cracker stuffed fruit, a video showing extreme brutality has come to light in Telangana.

The video of animal torture shows a monkey being hanged to death from a tree by three people. They reportedly did that to scare away other monkeys in Khammam district of Telangana, according to forest department officials.

“The perpetrators, who admitted their guilt, are being booked under the Wildlife Protection Act,” Sathupalli Forest Range Officer A Venkateswarlu said.

The tragedy occured on June 26 in Vemsoor village. The video of the monkey being hanged using a rope has gone viral and created a social media furore. The video now being widely circulated on the internet has prompted officials to probe the incident.”The accused wanted to scare other monkeys by hanging the one which was caught.We found the carcass in a decomposed state. The accused are being booked under the Wildlife Protection Act,” said the forest official.

Monkey menace is said to have become rampant in Sathupalli and nearby areas giving locals sleepless nights.

The official said as per a Telangana government directive, 30 per cent of the area in Sathupalli forest range during afforestation will have edible wild fruit species to enhance the food base of monkeys and other wild animals so that when they are rehabilitated, there will be sufficient food available.

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Telangana villagers hang monkey to death, three held after video goes viral

Written by Rahul V Pisharody | Hyderabad | Updated: June 29, 2020 6:16:54 pm

Three persons have been arrested in connection with the incident that took place at Ammapalem village in Vemsuru mandal Friday. (Video screengrab)

In yet another instance of cruelty towards animals, a monkey was hanged to death from a tree in Telangana’s Khammam district. In a video that is going viral on social media, the monkey could be seen battling for life while onlookers with sticks are heard cheering.

Three persons have been arrested in connection with the incident that took place at Ammapalem village in Vemsuru mandal Friday.

According to officials, the villagers were under the impression that the monkey was dead before they hung it from the tree. They also said the village had been facing monkey menace.

On Friday, as a troop of monkeys raided the teak plantation in the area, the main accused, Sadhu Venkateshwara Rao, and two others tried to chase them away with sticks. Reportedly, one of the monkeys fell down and became unconscious.

The FRO said the villagers apparently thought the monkey had died and decided to hang it from a tree to scare other monkeys so that they stop raiding the village. The monkey, however, regained consciousness and the accused filmed the animal as it struggled to breathe. They then shared the video on local WhatsApp groups.

As the video was shared widely in local Whatsapp groups, it also came to the notice of forest officials who visited the plantation and investigated the matter. They recovered the monkey’s carcass from a nearby field on Sunday.

“From what they have stated, it does not look like a deliberate act of cruelty towards animals. No one would hang a monkey to death. But it is still an offence and the three have been booked under section 9 of the Wildlife Protection Act for hunting a wild animal,” the FRO told indianexpress.com.

The FRO said the three accused were arrested Monday and released on station bail on the court’s advice.

The forest department has filed a POR (preliminary offence report) and recorded the statements of the accused.

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Monkey Helpline starts petition to regulate airguns

Durban – THE Monkey Helpline has started a petition to regulate ownership and possession of airguns because of the number of animal deaths they cause.

Monkey Helpline founder Steve Smit said they rescued in excess of 1 000 vervet monkeys annually, close to 100 a month.

Injuries range from broken bones, head trauma, massive tissue damage, blindness, life-threatening bite wounds, poisoning, burns and more.

These injuries are caused by dog bites, being run over by motor cars, shot with lead or steel pellets from air guns, electrocution on non-insulated, high-voltage power lines and transformers, and being trapped or snared.

“More than 80% of the monkeys rescued have lead or steel airgun pellets in various parts of their bodies,” Smit said.

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People hang monkey to death in Telangana’s Khammam district

In a shocking and brutal incident against animals, a group of people had hanged a monkey to death in Telangana’s Khammam district. The incident is of Ammapalem village. 
As per reports, the people hanged monkey so that the other monkeys stay away from the area due to fear. They also released dogs behind the monkeys so they run away from the area. 
Watch the report to know more. 

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Monkey hanged in Telangana’s Khammam

Image used for representational purpose

HYDERABAD: In a gruesome case of human brutality, a monkey was hanged to death from a tree at a teak plantation in Vemsoor, Khammam. The incident came to light after a video showing the monkey struggling while it was hanged went viral on social media. The video also shows two dogs trying to intervene from beneath the tree, but in vain.
According to the forest officials, one of the caretakers of the teak plantation, Sadu Venkateshwar Rao and two others attacked three monkeys with a sticks before he decided to hang one of them as a ‘lesson’ for the rest of the primates that entered the plantation.
“They first attacked the monkeys with sticks. While the monkeys tried to escape, one of them slipped and fell in a water tank. Instead of saving the monkey, the caretaker decided to hang it to a tree to ward off other monkeys by scaring them. We visited the spot and recovered the body,” said A Venkateshwarulu, forest range officer, Khammam.
“During interrogation, Rao and two others confessed to the crime and said they hanged the monkey thinking it was dead after it fell in the water tank but gained conciousness after it was hanged. Irrespective of it was alive or dead, it is a crime under Wildlife Act,” said Venkateshwarulu. “They tried to burn the body. We recovered the partially burnt body from the site,” the FRO added. A case has been registered under Section 9 of Wildlife Protection Act, 1972. However, the officials informed that no arrests were made due to Covid-19 situation.