Categories
News

Stop selling products that use monkey labour: UK PM’s fiancee tells retailers

Boris Johnson et al. posing for the camera: FILE PHOTO: Six Nations Championship - England v Wales © Reuters/TOBY MELVILLE FILE PHOTO: Six Nations Championship – England v Wales

LONDON (Reuters) – Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s fiancée Carrie Symonds on Friday welcomed pledges by four British retailers to stop selling coconut products that use monkey labour in their production and called on others to do the same.

“Glad Waitrose [JLPLC.UL], Co-op, Boots & Ocado have vowed not to sell products that use monkey labour, while Morrisons has already removed these from its stores,” Symonds said on her Twitter account.

Symonds, a conservationist, was responding to a report in The Telegraph newspaper which highlighted the plight of pigtailed macaques that are taken from the wild in Thailand and used on farms to harvest coconuts.

She called on all other supermarkets to boycott the products.

“I’m told Asda , Tesco & Sainsbury’s STILL sell such products,” she said.

Asda, Tesco and Sainsbury’s did not have an immediate comment.

(Reporting by James Davey; editing by Michael Holden)

Categories
News

India: Viral video of a monkey killed by hanging in a Telangana village, to warn other monkeys, sparks outrage on Twitter

Monkey
Photo for illustrative purposes Image Credit: Pixabay

This week, a disturbing incident of animal cruelty took place in a village, in the Indian state of Telangana. A monkey was killed by hanging, by the villagers. A video of the June 26 incident has gone viral on Twitter, sparking outrage at the inhumane treatment of the animal, and the reason behind the crime.

According to news reports, several monkeys were raiding the teak plantation, fields and houses in a Khammam village, over the last few days. The villagers tried to chase the animals away. In a bid to “warn other monkeys”, the villagers caught one of the monkeys, and hung it from a tree.

Twitter user @streetdogsof tweeted: “ #Monkey hanged … to scare other simians… people blame that monkeys come in their areas. Really? We have occupied all forests.”

@itsdhanashree tweeted: “We humans are so sick.”

The disturbing video shows the monkey beating his hands around and struggling to breathe. Two dogs were also released to scare it. However, while one dog barks at the monkey for a few seconds, and runs away, the other seems perplexed and looks around with concern.

Tweep @grihini posted: “Those two dogs are showing signs of concern…”

And, @PAgarwal01 posted: “What has happened to people these days? Where has humanity gone? Look at the dogs they are better than we humans.”

However, the men remained unmoved, and were even holding long wooden sticks. It is unclear if they beat the monkey.

According to a news report on punemirror.indiatimes.com: “Sathupalli Forest Range Officer (FRO) A Venkateswaralu said three persons were picked up for brutally killing of monkey. He said a case under Wildlife Protection Act (WPA) was registered against them. According to information available, a group of monkeys that regularly enter fields, was moving around the house of a farmer.”

Apparently, while three people were arrested, they were later released on bail. Tweep @asharmeet02 posted an update: “A Preliminary Offence Report has been registered in this regard by Khammam Forest Dept under Sections 9 and 51 of Wildlife Protection Act, 1972. All three perpetrators were arrested but later released on bail. Cases like these yet again highlight the need for stronger laws.”

Coming just a few weeks after the death of a pregnant elephant in Kerala, after it swallowed a pineapple stuffed with explosives, this incident has again raised a discussion on animal cruelty in the country.

Tagging animal rights groups and activists, tweep @Anivalayanghat posted: “Request Peta (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) authorities and Smt. Maneka Gandhi to enquire into the incident… and severely punish the culprits so that such a heinous acts never happens again…”

Categories
News

Monkey Jungle Card

Monkey Jungle Card

If you know someone who could use a little pick me up these adorable Monkies are ready to swing in and do the job. Caly used new stamps from Pretty Pink Posh for this fun card. I love how she combine different techniques of ink blending, stenciling and dies for her background, it has so much dimension.

Visit the Pretty Pink Posh blog for her video tutorial.

-Heather

Categories
News

Treetop cameras capture first known video of a wild roloway monkey

  • Treetop cameras in Côte d’Ivoire’s Tanoé-Ehy forest recently captured the first known video of a wild roloway monkey, a critically endangered species that spends most of its time high up in trees.
  • There are only about 300 roloway monkeys left in the wild, and 36 individuals living in captivity, so conservation efforts are paramount to preserve the species, according to experts.
  • Conservationists are also hoping to capture video of the critically endangered Miss Waldron’s red colobus monkey, which hasn’t been spotted in 42 years.

When conservationists set up treetop cameras in Côte d’Ivoire’s Tanoé-Ehy forest, they hoped to get video of the elusive Miss Waldron’s red colobus monkey (Piliocolobus waldroni), a critically endangered species that hasn’t been spotted in 42 years. But instead, another rare, arboreal primate presented itself: the roloway monkey (Cercopithecus roloway).

This is actually the first time a wild roloway monkey has ever been captured on video, according to Global Wildlife Conservation, the group that supported the camera trap project, along with the Swiss Center for Scientific Research in Côte d’Ivoire, Florida Atlantic University, and a number of other institutions and organizations.

“You cannot follow the monkeys in such forests and must be very lucky if you want to snap them when you meet them before they flee,” Inza Koné, general director of the Swiss Center for Scientific Research in Côte d’Ivoire and leader of a Tanoé-Ehy community-based conservation project, told Mongabay in an email. “That’s why camera trapping appeared as the best way to get some footage from the wild. Until recently, most photos of the monkey were from captivity.”

In a few short video clips, two different roloway monkeys are seen climbing along the branches of an ewuliké tree, searching for insects to eat.

“We frequently encountered or heard the calls of this monkey in the forest,” André Koffi, a researcher at the Swiss Center for Scientific Research in Côte d’Ivoire who was directly involved with the camera trap project, told Mongabay in an email. “Our big surprise is that we don’t have as many … videos of this monkey. We firmly believe that the next checking of the cameras will give us many [more] videos of the Roloway monkey.”

One of the roloway monkeys captured by tree cameras in Côte d’Ivoire’s Tanoé-Ehy forest. Image provided by Global Wildlife Conservation.

Roloway monkeys, part of a genus known as guenons, used to live across southern Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana, but hunting and trapping greatly reduced the species’ range. Now these animals primarily live in the Tanoé-Ehy forest in southeast Côte d’Ivoire, with a “much smaller population” in the Kwabré forest in Ghana, said Koné, adding that a “couple of individuals” may also survive in the central coastal region of Côte d’Ivoire.

The roloway monkey is listed by the IUCN as a critically endangered species, with fewer than 2,000 individuals left in the wild, according to a 2019 assessment. A more recent survey conducted by the Swiss Center for Scientific Research in Côte d’Ivoire calculates that only about 300 individuals are left in the wild, Koné said.

There are also 36 roloway monkeys living in zoos around the world, said Koné, who described these captive populations as “very small and fragile,” with the individuals requiring a high level of care. All of these zoos are members of the EAZA Ex situ programme (EEP), which aims to maintain captive populations to help reinstate wild populations, according to Koné.

A long-tailed pangolin climbing a tree in Côte d’Ivoire’s Tanoé-Ehy forest. Image provided by Global Wildlife Conservation.

“They already sent one male back to Ghana [to the] Endangered Primate Breeding Center,” Koné said, “and are about to send back a female to offer an opportunity for them to breed.”

There are also mounting efforts to protect the roloway monkey in the Tanoé-Ehy forest through research, education, community engagement, surveillance and habitat preservation, Koné said.

“We are about to lose Miss Waldron’s red colobus because it is getting obvious that we might find a couple of surviving individuals, not a viable population,” Koné said. “If we do not anticipate, roloway guenons might be among the next monkeys … driven to extinction.”

Besides the roloway monkey, the treetop cameras captured many other species, including the Lowe’s mona monkey (Cercopithecus lowei), the white-crested hornbill (Horizocerus albocristatus), the long-tailed pangolin (Phataginus tetradactyla), the critically endangered white-thighed colobus (Colobus vellerosus), and the endangered white-naped mangabey (Cercocebus lunulatus).

Conservationists are also holding out hope of finding the Miss Waldron’s red colobus monkey, either through camera trapping or via eDNA techniques, which can help identify the presence of a species through soil and water samples.

“We plan to make a survey by pirogue [canoe] in search of Miss Waldron in the rainy season, which begins now and will reach its maximum in the month of September,” Koffi said.

“Tropical mammals in general are hard to study, but the arboreal ones add so much complexity,” Daniel Alempijevic, a graduate student at Florida Atlantic University who was involved in the camera trap project, said in a statement. “These canopy camera trap surveys are opening up a new world to us, and may ultimately be the key to finding Miss Waldron’s red colobus. But Miss Waldron’s or not, so far this has been an exceptional survey reinforcing just how important Tanoé-Ehy Forest is as a last refuge for some of these species.”

Banner image caption: A roloway monkey at Cerza Zoo in France. Image by Damian Entwistle / Flickr.

Elizabeth Claire Alberts is a staff writer for Mongabay. Follow her on Twitter @ECAlberts.

FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.

, , , , , , , , , , , ,
Categories
News

Farewell to the Monkey House: The End of My F.Q. Story

The phone rang and pinged and whirred that week, two years ago this month, while I unpacked a lifetime of inanimate objects. The interruptions were all the same: voices and voicemails and text messages and instant messages and emails, asking over and over again a single, outraged question: “Did you see what they did to your house?”

I wanted, each time, to reply, “Leave me alone, I am trying to unbox 11 sets of dishes.” Instead I said, “It’s not our house anymore. We no longer live in F.Q. Story.”

We had lived there, though — for nearly 17 years, in that big green California Craftsman on the corner of Seventh Avenue and Willetta Street, a hard-to-miss house you glanced at as you were heading onto the interstate two blocks behind. People knew that house, which has stood there since 1924, because it was so visible, or because they’d heard about the monkeys and the snakes that had once lived there. In Phoenix, an old house isn’t just an old house; it’s a curiosity, designated “special” by signage, protected and coddled by city preservationists.

My husband and I knew the house before we bought it, too, in a wouldn’t-it-be-nice-to-live-there-one-day sort of way that quietly acknowledged how we’d never be able to afford such a place as we shopped for our first home together in summer 2002.

It turned out we could afford it. The couple who’d bought the place in the 1990s as a forever home had fallen on hard times and had priced to sell. They’d purchased the house from a pair of firemen, brothers who restored and flipped historic homes. The firemen had sanded its floors and replaced its windows and commissioned from a man named Marvin a gigantic and uncommonly ugly travertine fireplace in the living room. The brothers had bought the house from a bank after the two nice hippies who’d lived there in the ’70s and ’80s had been foreclosed upon. The hippies kept snakes and monkeys in the house, we were later told, and the house had become known in the neighborhood as the Monkey House.

“I know that house,” my housekeeper said when I told her we’d bought it. “I’ve driven by it for years; it’s too big, don’t ask me to clean it.” She changed her mind after we convinced her that the Monkey House’s mass was mostly a mirage. The rooms were large and there were two separate dining rooms, but the colossal wraparound porch and porte cochere made the place look bigger than it really was. We pictured parties on that porch and imagined ourselves lounging there with books and maybe a vodka stinger, comparing notes with neighbors about the best way to restore tongue-in-groove wainscoting and other old-house things.

We liked our new, like-minded neighbors just fine (except for the couple next door, who were monsters), but it turned out most of them were too busy making their homes look newly old to do much hanging out. We waved to one another at Historic Preservation meetings and stopped to briefly chat at nurseries and antiques auctions and architecture reclamation sales, but we never lingered. Our ancient homes beckoned. They needed their sagging foundations re-poured, their tacky granite countertops jackhammered and replaced with vintage soapstone.

We, who recently had renovated my great-grandparents’ Victorian millhouse in northeast Ohio, happily joined the F.Q. Story fray. Outside, we ripped out flagstone flooring from the side patio, jettisoned a pair of concrete-and-river-rock planters, and scraped an outdoor fountain that some wiseacre had grafted onto the base of our chimney in the ’80s. We hired someone to remove all the wrought-iron and chain-link fencing, to chop down the randomly placed trees, to stain and seal an ocean of ancient concrete patio. Inside, we yanked up low-pile, dusty rose carpeting and sanded the subfloor beneath until it glowed; tore out wall-mounted washbasins from Lowe’s and replaced them with pedestal sinks from antique malls; ripped down fluorescent tube lighting and replaced it with fixtures from auctions and special-order reclamation shops.

Other people lived in suburban neighborhoods and apartment complexes and condominium high-rises, but we were preservationists. We didn’t just live in our homes, we rescued them from crap foisted on them from former owners who shopped endcaps at Home Depot and thought the only thing wrong with an old house was that it didn’t look like last year’s model. Our houses weren’t real estate investments so much as they were wrongs that needed righting; our work was an apology to dead architects whose designs had been blighted by “updates” that embarrassed us because they weren’t “period correct.”

We were inordinately house-proud, we F.Q. Storyites, welcoming photographers from glossy home-and-garden magazines to document our every plaster molding, each of the windowsills we’d painstakingly restored. We threw open our doors every December to thousands of strangers who wandered our homes, marveling at the 13-inch baseboards and crazy forced-air-furnace vents in our shiny walnut floors. (One visitor to the Monkey House during the 2009 F.Q. Story Historic Home Tour eyed our wall of built-in glass-fronted cupboards piled with Harkerware and announced to her companion, “Homosexuals live here.”)

It was worth all the work. No one who lives in a newly built semi-detached condo in Glendale has ever opened his door to an 87-year-old woman and six of her progeny who are there because Grandma was raised here in the ’30s, and could they come in and look around? This happened a lot. I met one of the firemen who rescued our house from ruin when he stopped by one day to ask why in the world we’d painted the place such ugly shades of green. (He made up for his rudeness by handing me six photo albums filled with before-and-after pictures of our house from 1987.) And one of the hippies himself showed up on a Saturday to announce that he’d once lived there, had since kicked drugs, and wanted to show me where his monkeys had been kept. (They had had the entire top floor, it turned out, where they had shat on the floor. The snakes had lived in the basement, in homemade cages. One of them, a small python, might still be down there, this nice man told me. She’d gotten out and vanished one day in the early 1980s.)

It wasn’t fear that a rogue snake might devour our housecat that convinced us to sell the Monkey House and move into a midtown high-rise built in the 1960s. In the end, it was the monthly $400 summertime water bills, because our Craftsman sat on two lots which, according to the City’s Historic Preservation department, had to be lush and green, year-round. It was the fact that even the best air conditioning couldn’t adequately cool the top floor of our nearly-100-year-old house. And perhaps that we lived in a house with two dining rooms yet ate dinner each night off the coffee table in front of the television. And maybe a little bit that each day we walked past hundreds of square feet of wraparound porch that we never used.

The Monkey House comes to me in my dreams. Last month, I dreamed that it had been completely modernized and was on the market again. “Why would they do that?” I asked my husband in this dream, referring to the nice young couple who’d bought our former home. “Why not just buy a new house instead of ripping apart an historic one?”

The next day he, unaware I’d had that dream, texted me a just-posted real estate listing for the Monkey House. “Take the virtual tour,” he insisted. “They’ve completely renovated the place.” I refused, having already done so in my sleep the night before.

We were not sad to have left F.Q. Story, to be living in the sky instead of in a notorious and well-loved old house. Friends and former neighbors seemed to mind, though. When, only a few weeks after we’d moved away, the new owners painted our former home white with black trim — a terrible choice for a Craftsman, particularly one with a chocolate brown shingled roof — people were outraged on our behalf. For weeks, they phoned and emailed and texted their indignation.

I was secretly glad that the Monkey House no longer looked like itself. When I glanced over at it now, heading toward the freeway, I thought our former home appeared embarrassed to be caught in public wearing the palette of a saltbox or a Colonial. It looked like some other place than the home we’d restored, even while it continued standing. This made being gone from it so much easier to bear.

Categories
News

Monkey Transplanted with Liver of Pig Survives for 18 Days in China, Could Humans be Next?

Image for representation | Image credit: Reuters

Image for representation | Image credit: Reuters

The breakthrough can mean a step in the direction of animal-human transplants that could benefit millions of patients waiting for organ transplants.

Buzz Staff
  • News18.com
  • Last Updated: July 2, 2020, 5:14 PM IST

Share this:

In what is being seen as a breakthrough for medical science, a monkey has been transplanted with the liver of a pig in China and managed to survive for 18 days.

Earlier in the month, a team of surgeons from a hospital in Xi’an in North-Western China performed organ transplant surgeries on three rhesus macaques.

Doctors at Xijing Hospital, which is affiliated to Xi’an’s Air Force Medical University, extracted three organs including a liver, a heart, and a kidney, were extracted from a pig and transplanted into the monkeys, each getting one organ.

Neither the monkey with the kidney transplant nor the one with the heart transplant survived. The primate with the new liver, however, has managed to survive for over two weeks, giving researchers hope, Xinhua news reported.

As per the doctors, the survival of the monkey could indicate the possibility of such transplants in humans.

The experiment was conducted using a gene-editing technique known as porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV). The experiment comes after China developed two baby “chimera piglets” with DNA from monkeys.

The efforts might help scientists find replacements for human organ transplants by growing human organs inside genetically controlled animals. Transplanting animal organs into human bodies, also known as Xenotransplantation, is an exciting new trend in bioengineering and pigs are often seen as the best source for such organ transplants owing to their similarity to humans in shape and size.

The trial is being seen as a success since monkeys also share 94 percent of human DNA, making this trial one of the closes anyone has come to a human-animal organ transplant. This might mean a boon for millions of people waiting for organ transplants across the world.

Categories
News

Legendary Monkey King actor Dicky Cheung returns to star in LEGO’s ‘Monkie Kid’

Monkey King fans rejoice!

A new series based on the ancient tale will be airing in Southeast Asia soon. And the best part?

Legendary actor and singer Dicky Cheung, who starred in the 1996 Hong Kong television series Journey to the West which many of us grew up with, will be starring in the Mandarin dub of LEGO’s latest series Monkie Kid.

Talk about recruiting the perfect person for the role!

IMAGE: LEGO

Comprising of a TV series and mini-movie, LEGO’s Monkie Kid is set to premier in Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong, and Taiwan in late 2020.

This will be Cheung’s first time starring as a voice talent for LEGO. He will also be performing the animation’s theme song.

“Through Monkie Kid, we wanted to create a world where the LEGO play experience is brought to life while facilitating a greater appreciation of the Chinese culture and values among our audiences,” Rohan Mathur, The LEGO Group’s Marketing Director for Southeast Asia, said.

“With Dicky’s experience in playing the legendary role of Monkey King, we hope the depth and dimension he brings to the character of Monkie Kid will captivate viewers from all generations in Singapore and Malaysia, while empowering children with the important values of bravery, optimism, and resilience.”

Watch the English trailer for the series here.

Monkie Kid is LEGO’s take on the more than 500-year old story of the Monkey King.

The series follows the titular character Monkie Kid on a journey as he discovers the Monkey King’s legendary staff and begins his quest to stop the Demon Bull King and his army of Bull clones from taking over the city.

 
LEGO releases its first ever Chinese-inspired theme and it’s based on the legend of the Monkey King.

Check out the toy collection available on LEGO’s website here.

Follow Mashable SEA on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.

Cover image sourced from Toy Photographers and LEGO.

Categories
News

Back Door Monkey heating up battle for Miami’s coolest new restaurant

MIAMI (WSVN) – South Florida is an urban jungle, and in the middle of it all is a new spot serving up some delicious food.

The battle for Miami’s coolest restaurant just got even bigger.

Bryan Carvajal, Back Door Monkey: “Once you walk into the place you feel in a little bit of an oasis. The energy is amazing.”

The decor is on point, but what you can’t miss is the DJ booth.

Bryan Carvajal: “Once you come and see the place, you will see things such as like a war tank, which we use as a DJ booth.”

There’s a tank in the middle of the restaurant, and it looks legit.

It was custom designed and made for music. It doesn’t move, and the only one who can climb in it is the DJ.

Bryan Carvajal: “People ask if it is a real tank. It’s not. It’s just a replica.”

You can come for the music, but stay for the Asian fusion food.

Nicolas Caicedo, chef, Back Door Monkey: “We are doing Asian with Latin influences. The menu was created in a way where people from all over the world can come and try the different options we have.”

Carmen Tinoco, customer: “It’s an amazing place. Amazing food, and the taste is awesome.”

You can check out the roasted king crab legs and their signature sushi roll with octopus.

Nicolas Caicedo: “We glaze it and blow torch a peanut butter and masago mayonnaise.”

If you like your fish dishes a little more raw, the sashimi is the way to go.

Nicolas Caicedo: “Our sashimi is unique because every fish has a sauce to go with. I feel like that was the idea behind this dish. We didn’t want to do just a sashimi platter. We wanted to do something unique.”

Even the fried rice has a twist. A server mixes an egg yolk in it at your table.

Carmen Tinoco: “The vibe is really chill, and it’s amazing to be eating and listening to music. The music is amazing too.”

The restaurant will take your temperature upon entering.

For more info:
backdoormonkey.com
305-951-6143

Copyright 2020 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Categories
News

Smiley: You can’t catch a monkey in the dark

Tony Falterman, of Napoleonville, says, “The entry in your column about turning out the lights reminded me of my predecessor and good friend, Sheriff Murray Landry of Assumption Parish.

“He used to tell the story about a woman who called in one night about a loose monkey in her house. Never one to miss a good ‘call in’ complaint, he decided to handle it himself.

“In trying to capture the wayward simian, he would chase it around a room — but every time he got near a capture, the intelligent ape would jump up and pull the cord on the old-time light hanging from the ceiling in the middle of the room.

“Murray would pull the string to bring back light, and chase the monkey, until the monkey again pulled the cord and darkened the room!

“The sheriff finally called it quits, and told the homeowner he would be back during daylight hours for the capture!”

Getting weird

Looking over the item above, it occurs to me that the headline on it is probably the strangest I’ve ever written…

Umbrella and all

Riecke Gernon has this suggestion for a new name for Dixie Beer:

“What better way to honor the memory of Tom Benson than to have ‘Tom’s Boogie Beer?'”

Slight change

Bill Huey offers a new name for Dixie Beer that would call for only a minor alteration of its lettering:

“I believe they should rename it ‘Dixon Beer,’ in honor of Dave Dixon, the man who helped create the Superdome and the Saints.”

Playing the Pastime

Fellow LSU Class of ’63 graduate Norris Decoteau recalls Bill Conti, the Oscar-winning composer who just donated his original scores to the university:

“I was a resident of North Stadium at the same time as Bill. He and Buddy Wells from New Orleans were roommates.

“I wonder if he is also going to give his original scores from the Pastime Lounge, where the Bill Conti Trio played?”

Cord guy

Preston Holton, of New Orleans, says, “One night circa 1980 my girlfriend (now wife of 34 years) and I were in a packed Joe Reed’s bar on Baton Rouge’s Highland Road to hear legendary blues man Albert ‘Ice Man’ Collins.

“At one point Collins stepped off the stage in mid-jam and went wading into the crowd.

“Following him was a little guy carefully uncoiling a long spool of cord, out the door and into the parking lot, then finally back on stage.

“Ice Man never came unplugged and never missed a note, but the real star of the show was that cord guy.”

Cajun Isles

James B. Hébert, of Abbeville, says, “The Cajun Islands mentioned Wednesday are in Vermilion Parish, the most Cajun place on earth.

“Visit Vermilion.org for ideas for your staycation. My ancestors have been here since 1802.”

And Bo Bienvenu, of Prairieville, says, “I have a souvenir T-shirt (that fit until I put it in my ‘shrinking closet’) I bought at the Crawfish Festival decades ago.

“It shows two crawfish floating on air mattresses and says, ‘For my vacation I visited The Islands: Cow, Pecan, and Forked.'”

Nostalgia Corner

Recently I’ve mentioned some Baton Rouge bars that are no more. Marion Denova tells of another longtime business that’s closed:

“One of the oldest remaining businesses in Old Baton Rouge, Istrouma Mattress Factory, officially closed in mid-April.

“It was established in 1932 at the corner of Scenic Highway and Winbourne Avenue, then moved to Plank Road, in the old Goudeau and Huey Hardware building, in the early 1990s.

“We were open six days a week, except for four days we were closed because of Hurricane Katrina. Thanks to all our good customers in south Louisiana.”

Special People Dept.

  • Betty Bourgeois, of Houma, celebrates her 90th birthday Thursday, July 2.
  • Sybil and Joe Boudreaux, of Ventress, celebrate their 71st anniversary Thursday, July 2.

Helpful hint

In health news, Harry Clark, of Lafayette, says, “I have found that if you don’t shower but once a week, don’t use deodorant, eat a lot of garlic and don’t brush your teeth, social distancing takes care of itself.”

Categories
News

Monkey receives a liver transplant from a pig and survives for 16 days, Chinese surgeons claim

A monkey which received a pig’s liver during a groundbreaking experiment in China has survived for over two weeks, experts have claimed.

The animal is one of the three macaques that underwent organ transplant operations conducted by a team of surgeons earlier this month, according to a hospital in north-western China’s Xi’an city.

The success could mean that Chinese researchers are a step closer to solve a global shortage of human organs for transplantation, the hospital has said. 

A monkey which received a pig's liver during a groundbreaking experiment in China survived for over two weeks, surgeons have claimed. The picture shows the animal after surgery

A monkey which received a pig's liver during a groundbreaking experiment in China survived for over two weeks, surgeons have claimed. The picture shows the animal after surgery

A monkey which received a pig’s liver during a groundbreaking experiment in China survived for over two weeks, surgeons have claimed. The picture shows the animal after surgery

The animal was one of the three rhesus macaques that underwent organ transplant operations conducted by a team of researchers earlier this month in northwestern China's Xi'an city

The animal was one of the three rhesus macaques that underwent organ transplant operations conducted by a team of researchers earlier this month in northwestern China's Xi'an city

The animal was one of the three rhesus macaques that underwent organ transplant operations conducted by a team of researchers earlier this month in northwestern China’s Xi’an city

Medical experts extracted a pig’s heart, kidney and liver before transplanting the organs to three rhesus macaques on June 13, according to the Xijing Hospital, which is affiliated to China’s Air Force Medical University. 

Footage released by the local government shows one of the primates lying on the operating table after the medical experts completing the procedure.  

The three transplants were conducted at the same time and all organs were functioning perfectly following the surgery, the Xi’an hospital said.

The monkey that received a kidney only survived for a day while the primate with a transplanted heart died after a week. 

But the macaque with the pig’s liver had lived 16 days – the longest-surviving animal to receive a foreign liver transplant in the world – the team announced on Monday. It is understood that the monkey remains alive. 

A team of Chinese medics extracted a pig's heart, kidney and liver before transplanting the organs to three monkeys on June 13, according to the Xijin Hospital in north-western China

A team of Chinese medics extracted a pig's heart, kidney and liver before transplanting the organs to three monkeys on June 13, according to the Xijin Hospital in north-western China

A team of Chinese medics extracted a pig’s heart, kidney and liver before transplanting the organs to three monkeys on June 13, according to the Xijin Hospital in north-western China

The monkey that received a kidney only survived for a day while the primate with a transplanted heart died after a week. The picture shows the monkey after receiving a pig's liver

The monkey that received a kidney only survived for a day while the primate with a transplanted heart died after a week. The picture shows the monkey after receiving a pig's liver

The monkey that received a kidney only survived for a day while the primate with a transplanted heart died after a week. The picture shows the monkey after receiving a pig’s liver

The researchers said that they used a genome-editing technique known as porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) to perform the experiment. A scientist is pictured explaining the operation after completing all three transplants from a pig to three monkeys in Xi'an

The researchers said that they used a genome-editing technique known as porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) to perform the experiment. A scientist is pictured explaining the operation after completing all three transplants from a pig to three monkeys in Xi'an

The researchers said that they used a genome-editing technique known as porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) to perform the experiment. A scientist is pictured explaining the operation after completing all three transplants from a pig to three monkeys in Xi’an

The researchers said that they used a genome-editing technique known as porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) to perform the experiment. 

The record-breaking experiment comes after two chimera piglets containing monkey DNA have previously been born in China.

Although both died within a week and appeared to be normal, the baby animals had genetic material from cynomolgus monkeys in their heart, liver, spleen, lung and skin.

Scientists said the research, which required more than 4,000 embryos to get the piglets, aims to find ways of growing human organs in animals for transplantation.

The record-breaking experiment comes after two chimera piglets containing monkey DNA have previously been born in China. Although both died within a week and appeared to be normal, the baby animals had genetic material from cynomolgus monkeys

The record-breaking experiment comes after two chimera piglets containing monkey DNA have previously been born in China. Although both died within a week and appeared to be normal, the baby animals had genetic material from cynomolgus monkeys

The record-breaking experiment comes after two chimera piglets containing monkey DNA have previously been born in China. Although both died within a week and appeared to be normal, the baby animals had genetic material from cynomolgus monkeys

‘This is the first report of full-term monkey-pig chimeras’, Tang Hai at the State Key Laboratory of Stem Cell and Reproductive Biology in Beijing told New Scientist.

Five-day old piglet embryos had monkey stem cells injected into them that had been adjusted to produce a flourescent protein, allowing researchers to find out where the cells ended up.

The scientists said it was unclear why the two chimera piglets died, but as eight other normal piglets that were implanted also died, they think this is a problem with the IVF process rather than chimerism.

Despite the research, some members of the scientific community have warned against creating chimeras due to ethical concerns. 

Neuroscientist Douglas Munoz at Queen’s University in Kingston, Canada, said that research projects like this ‘just really ethically scares me’.

‘For us to start to manipulate life functions in this kind of way without fully knowing how to turn it off, or stop it if something goes awry really scares me.’

Monkey stem cells were injected into five-day-old pig embryos before they were implanted into sows. However, China shows no sign of stopping after proposing to create monkeys with partially human-derived brains in order to better study diseases like Alzheimer's

Monkey stem cells were injected into five-day-old pig embryos before they were implanted into sows. However, China shows no sign of stopping after proposing to create monkeys with partially human-derived brains in order to better study diseases like Alzheimer's

Monkey stem cells were injected into five-day-old pig embryos before they were implanted into sows. However, China shows no sign of stopping after proposing to create monkeys with partially human-derived brains in order to better study diseases like Alzheimer’s

However, China shows no sign of stopping after proposing to create monkeys with partially human-derived brains in order to better study diseases like Alzheimer’s.

And Yale University stem cell expert Alejandro De Los Angeles has written that the search for a better animal model to stimulate human disease has been a ‘holy grail’ of biomedical research for decades.

‘Realising the promise of human-monkey chimera research in an ethically and scientifically appropriate manner will require a coordinated approach’, he said.

A human-pig hybrid embryo was created in January 2017, at the Salk Institute in San Diego, but died 28 days later.

It is hoped the research could offer an alternative to organ donation.

Around three people a day die in the UK according to the NHS and 12 in the US because replacement organs cannot be found.