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Monkey pulls off daring heist at Sheng Siong outlet

It was a theft committed in broad daylight at a local supermarket. The unlikely perpetrator? A monkey.

The brazen shoplifter was caught on camera stealing a bag of bread from a Sheng Siong outlet at Block 417 Fernvale Link on Saturday (Aug 1), Lianhe Wanbao reported.

Footage of the incident, captured by an eyewitness, was shared on Facebook the next day.

In the minute-long video, the monkey, which appeared to be a long-tailed macaque, was shown pacing around the entrance of the store.

It then scampered to a shelf, swiped the bag of bread and fled to a nearby footpath, all in a matter of seconds.

As the person behind the camera approached it, the monkey escaped up a tree and dug into its spoils.

Smart Alex haha.. When you saw please do not feed the 🐵.. 😱Monkey see..monkey do eat 🍞

Dikirim oleh Raven Qiu pada Minggu, 02 Agustus 2020

An unidentified employee told the Chinese daily that this was not the first time the store had fallen victim to monkeys’ thieving.

Since the end of last year, monkeys have stolen bread from the store on about six occasions, they said.

The store had contacted the Animal Concerns Research and Education Society (ACRES) about the issue at the end of 2019.

“From April to July, during the circuit breaker period, the monkeys did not come back, so we thought they had been caught,” they added.

“We didn’t think they would re-emerge.”

kimberlylim@asiaone.com

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Monkey Sneakily Cops Bread From S’pore Shop, Lepaks In Tree For Teatime

Monkey Spotted Making Away With Bread From Singapore Shop, Clip Goes Viral

Wildlife is thriving in Singapore’s urban jungle. Some days, their antics catch us off guard and we either love or hate them for it.

From otters loitering outside a hospital to a wild pangolin stranded along a busy road, we thought we’ve seen it all.

But a viral clip of a monkey sneakily ‘stealing’ bread from a shop in Singapore shows that we continue to be enthralled by the way animals survive on our little red dot.

The viral clip, posted on Sunday (2 Aug), has garnered 600 shares in an hour.

Monkey quickly makes away with bread

We first see the monkey quietly crawling into the shop, its presence largely unnoticed by everyone inside. Seems like only the person behind the camera caught sight of it.

Source

With a deft motion of its nimble limbs, the monkey copped and made away with a packet of bread in just 3 seconds.

Source

Not knowing what it did was a crime for humans, the monkey then sits at the walkway right outside the shop, fiddling with the bag.

Source

Tries to pry plastic packaging open

Plastic can be a tricky thing to tear apart — an equal struggle to both mankind and animals apparently.

The monkey then decides to take its loot to greater heights, literally. It seems to be enjoying its time lepak-ing in the trees, getting to have bread for teatime.

Source

The location of the incident is unknown, as the clip only came with a caption of 2 words: Hello Police.

Singapore animals continue to charm their way through life

Judging from how fast the monkey ran away with the bread, one may deduce that it was likely hungry, refused to loaf around and started looking for food.

We sure hope that the shop took this monkey business into account, so that staff can account for one missing packet of bread at the end of the day.

Enjoy your teatime snack, little breadwinner.

Featured image from Facebook.

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Village goes bananas over loose monkey

SARANAC LAKE –If rescuing pets stuck in trees has gotten old, the Saranac Lake Police Department got a more interesting call Friday afternoon when they answered a call about an escaped monkey.

The Police Department responded to a report of a monkey on the loose at 4:45 p.m. Friday. The monkey had gotten out of its cage in a car belonging to Melissa Rowland of Dayton, Ohio.

After about half an hour, officers were able to catch the monkey and return it to Rowland. The matter was turned over to the Department of Environmental Conservation.

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Monkey World is back: park to reopen for pre-booked visits

MONKEY World is set to reopen to the public today.

The park closed its doors in March, the week before Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced the wider coronavirus lockdown restrictions across England.

At that time Monkey World director Dr Alison Cronin made it clear the “safety and wellbeing of our rescued monkeys and apes is, and always will be, our first priority.”

Then, mid-July the park reopened for adoptive parents only.

Now, in a statement on the Facebook page of the primate rescue centre, the wider public opening has been announced.

However, tickets are only available on a strictly pre-booked basis. – so don’t simply turn up thinking you’ll be able to get in.

There will also be a number of other precautions visitors need to take.

A park spokesman explained: “All visitors are required to wear a face mask/covering/visor when visiting to protect our wonderful rescued primates.

“We have now opened up afternoon entry slots from the 3rd August onwards, as well as the morning slots already available.

“Please do visit the website to book in, and read full reopening information, but we look forward to seeing you all at the park again.”

One of the most recent inhabitants at the park, near Wool, arrived just days before the coronavirus lockdown came into effect.

Kalu the chimpanzee had lived at Broadlands Stud, the South African estate of renowned racehorse trainer Pat Cavendish O’Neill.

Pat, who died last year, built up a menagerie of wild animals at Broadlands.

Kalu was kept at the stud farm in Somerset West, Cape Town, for more than 30 years following her capture from the wild in the Democratic Republic of Congo, formerly Zaire.

Kalu also featured predominantly in O’Neill’s written memoirs, ‘A Chimpanzee in the Wine Cellar’.

At that time Dr Cronin said: “Despite not having contact with her own kind since she was stolen from the wild as a baby, Kalu is reacting calmly and happily to the attentions of the new group.

“It shows how much chimpanzees want and need to be with other of their own kind regardless of how long they have lived alone.

“This is the story of so many of our rescued chimps at the park.”

Visit monkeyworld.org for further details on booking a visit to Monkey World.

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People live in harmony with golden snub-nosed monkey in Yangxian County, Shaanxi

A golden snub-nosed monkey is pictured with a villager who ever fed it at Maoping Village of Maoping Town in Yangxian County, northwest China’s Shaanxi Province, Aug. 2, 2020. A wild grown golden snub-nosed monkey, China’s first-class protected species, has recently come by the village. The monkey found foods at villagers’ homes by day and went back forest at night, seeming to be not afraid of people. Located in the southern foot of the Qinling Mountains, Yangxian County, where the village lies in, is home to many rare animal species including giant pandas, crested ibis, golden snub-nosed monkeys and takins. It’s not rare to see those endangered animals appear at villages. Local people have formed a high sense of animal protection, living harmoniously with them. (Xinhua/Tao Ming)

 

A golden snub-nosed monkey is pictured with a villager at Maoping Village of Maoping Town in Yangxian County, northwest China’s Shaanxi Province, Aug. 2, 2020. A wild grown golden snub-nosed monkey, China’s first-class protected species, has recently come by the village. The monkey found foods at villagers’ homes by day and went back forest at night, seeming to be not afraid of people. Located in the southern foot of the Qinling Mountains, Yangxian County, where the village lies in, is home to many rare animal species including giant pandas, crested ibis, golden snub-nosed monkeys and takins. It’s not rare to see those endangered animals appear at villages. Local people have formed a high sense of animal protection, living harmoniously with them. (Xinhua/Tao Ming)

 

A golden snub-nosed monkey is pictured at Maoping Village of Maoping Town in Yangxian County, northwest China’s Shaanxi Province, Aug. 2, 2020. A wild grown golden snub-nosed monkey, China’s first-class protected species, has recently come by the village. The monkey found foods at villagers’ homes by day and went back forest at night, seeming to be not afraid of people. Located in the southern foot of the Qinling Mountains, Yangxian County, where the village lies in, is home to many rare animal species including giant pandas, crested ibis, golden snub-nosed monkeys and takins. It’s not rare to see those endangered animals appear at villages. Local people have formed a high sense of animal protection, living harmoniously with them. (Xinhua/Tao Ming)

 

A golden snub-nosed monkey is pictured shaking “hands” with a villager at Maoping Village of Maoping Town in Yangxian County, northwest China’s Shaanxi Province, Aug. 2, 2020. A wild grown golden snub-nosed monkey, China’s first-class protected species, has recently come by the village. The monkey found foods at villagers’ homes by day and went back forest at night, seeming to be not afraid of people. Located in the southern foot of the Qinling Mountains, Yangxian County, where the village lies in, is home to many rare animal species including giant pandas, crested ibis, golden snub-nosed monkeys and takins. It’s not rare to see those endangered animals appear at villages. Local people have formed a high sense of animal protection, living harmoniously with them. (Xinhua/Tao Ming)

 

A golden snub-nosed monkey is pictured at Maoping Village of Maoping Town in Yangxian County, northwest China’s Shaanxi Province, Aug. 2, 2020. A wild grown golden snub-nosed monkey, China’s first-class protected species, has recently come by the village. The monkey found foods at villagers’ homes by day and went back forest at night, seeming to be not afraid of people. Located in the southern foot of the Qinling Mountains, Yangxian County, where the village lies in, is home to many rare animal species including giant pandas, crested ibis, golden snub-nosed monkeys and takins. It’s not rare to see those endangered animals appear at villages. Local people have formed a high sense of animal protection, living harmoniously with them. (Xinhua/Tao Ming)

 

A golden snub-nosed monkey is pictured with a villager at Maoping Village of Maoping Town in Yangxian County, northwest China’s Shaanxi Province, Aug. 2, 2020. A wild grown golden snub-nosed monkey, China’s first-class protected species, has recently come by the village. The monkey found foods at villagers’ homes by day and went back forest at night, seeming to be not afraid of people. Located in the southern foot of the Qinling Mountains, Yangxian County, where the village lies in, is home to many rare animal species including giant pandas, crested ibis, golden snub-nosed monkeys and takins. It’s not rare to see those endangered animals appear at villages. Local people have formed a high sense of animal protection, living harmoniously with them. (Xinhua/Tao Ming)

 

A golden snub-nosed monkey is pictured with a villager at Maoping Village of Maoping Town in Yangxian County, northwest China’s Shaanxi Province, Aug. 2, 2020. A wild grown golden snub-nosed monkey, China’s first-class protected species, has recently come by the village. The monkey found foods at villagers’ homes by day and went back forest at night, seeming to be not afraid of people. Located in the southern foot of the Qinling Mountains, Yangxian County, where the village lies in, is home to many rare animal species including giant pandas, crested ibis, golden snub-nosed monkeys and takins. It’s not rare to see those endangered animals appear at villages. Local people have formed a high sense of animal protection, living harmoniously with them. (Xinhua/Tao Ming)

 

A golden snub-nosed monkey is pictured with villagers at Maoping Village of Maoping Town in Yangxian County, northwest China’s Shaanxi Province, Aug. 2, 2020. A wild grown golden snub-nosed monkey, China’s first-class protected species, has recently come by the village. The monkey found foods at villagers’ homes by day and went back forest at night, seeming to be not afraid of people. Located in the southern foot of the Qinling Mountains, Yangxian County, where the village lies in, is home to many rare animal species including giant pandas, crested ibis, golden snub-nosed monkeys and takins. It’s not rare to see those endangered animals appear at villages. Local people have formed a high sense of animal protection, living harmoniously with them. (Xinhua/Tao Ming)

 

A golden snub-nosed monkey is pictured at Maoping Village of Maoping Town in Yangxian County, northwest China’s Shaanxi Province, Aug. 2, 2020. A wild grown golden snub-nosed monkey, China’s first-class protected species, has recently come by the village. The monkey found foods at villagers’ homes by day and went back forest at night, seeming to be not afraid of people. Located in the southern foot of the Qinling Mountains, Yangxian County, where the village lies in, is home to many rare animal species including giant pandas, crested ibis, golden snub-nosed monkeys and takins. It’s not rare to see those endangered animals appear at villages. Local people have formed a high sense of animal protection, living harmoniously with them. (Xinhua/Tao Ming)

 

A golden snub-nosed monkey is pictured with villagers at Maoping Village of Maoping Town in Yangxian County, northwest China’s Shaanxi Province, Aug. 2, 2020. A wild grown golden snub-nosed monkey, China’s first-class protected species, has recently come by the village. The monkey found foods at villagers’ homes by day and went back forest at night, seeming to be not afraid of people. Located in the southern foot of the Qinling Mountains, Yangxian County, where the village lies in, is home to many rare animal species including giant pandas, crested ibis, golden snub-nosed monkeys and takins. It’s not rare to see those endangered animals appear at villages. Local people have formed a high sense of animal protection, living harmoniously with them. (Xinhua/Tao Ming)

 

A golden snub-nosed monkey is pictured with villagers at Maoping Village of Maoping Town in Yangxian County, northwest China’s Shaanxi Province, Aug. 2, 2020. A wild grown golden snub-nosed monkey, China’s first-class protected species, has recently come by the village. The monkey found foods at villagers’ homes by day and went back forest at night, seeming to be not afraid of people. Located in the southern foot of the Qinling Mountains, Yangxian County, where the village lies in, is home to many rare animal species including giant pandas, crested ibis, golden snub-nosed monkeys and takins. It’s not rare to see those endangered animals appear at villages. Local people have formed a high sense of animal protection, living harmoniously with them. (Xinhua/Tao Ming)

 

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‘Kids would come up to me and call me dirty monkey’ -Limerick students hope documentary will ‘amplify Black voices in Ireland’

Two women from Africa, who are studying in the University of Limerick, are aiming to “amplify Black voices in Ireland” with a documentary project that highlights racism in the country.

total of 20 personal testimonies are showcased in the Unsilencing Black Voices Documentary, created by Contemporary African Literature PhD student Sandrine Ndahiro and fifth year architecture student Cathy Osikoya, who are from Rwanda and Nigeria respectively.

After the death of George Floyd in the US, the two women decided to raise awareness of racism in Ireland and issued a plea on social media for those interested in taking part in a documentary to send a voice note or a one minute long clip discussing their own experiences.

The creators themselves have experienced racism and Ms Osikoya recalls how her first memory of racism was while she was in secondary school.

Cathy Osikoyo

“There were kids that would come up to me and call me ‘dirty monkey’. ‘You should go wash yourself’. ‘You smell’,” she said.

In the documentary, a Mayo native who now lives in Limerick says that she is tired of being praised on her ability to speak English.

“We as black people are tired, tired of being complimented on how well we speak English. Even though a lot of us have been here all our lives.”

Testimonies come from Limerick, Mayo, Galway, Carlow and Kilkenny and are divided into five categories – primary, secondary, third level, professional and daily life.

“The categories were created to show how some Black individuals experience racism from as early as primary school, and this continues, it never stops as it seeps its way from generation to generation. There is an ignorance that racism happens in isolated moments, but our documentary would debunk this ignorance,” Ms Ndahiro said.

“We hope that by watching our documentary you stop and actively listen to the pain in the black individuals who are sharing their stories,” she added.

It will be released for free viewing on Friday, August 7 and will be available on Youtube.

Online Editors

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No monkey business in coconut farming

MANILA, Philippines — Philippine coconut industry stakeholder, led by the Philippine Coconut Authority (PCA), say there is no monkey business in the local coco farming practice.

“Philippine Coconut farmers do not use monkeys in harvesting coconuts for local use, exports or even tourism purposes,” said (Ret. Maj. Gen.) Rhoderick Parayno of the PCA’s Office of the Administrator. Coconut trees dot an estimated 36 hectares of land in the Philippines, 3.5 million Filipinos are engaged in coconut farming .

“Not on our turf,” was the collective reaction of various Philippine coconut groups, after a video went viral showing monkeys harvesting coconuts elicited negative reaction from consumers, animal rights activists and other cause oriented groups abroad.

The use of monkey labor in harvesting coconuts in the Philippines was never a practice in its long history of coconut farming,” leading coco industry advocacy group United Coconut Association of the Philippines (UCAP) said. “Production of 15 billion nuts annually are manually harvested by coconut farmers and farm workers ,” UCAP further clarified in a statement.

The animal rights group People for Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) showed pigtailed macaques in Thailand working like “coconut-picking machines.” After seeing the video. the UK Prime Minister’s fiancee Carrie Symonds, a conservationist, recently called on all supermarkets to boycott the products. Experts. say that a tr ined monkey can collect up to 1000 nuts per day, while an experienced human coconut icker can only get up to 80 on a good-day.

The local arm of the (PETA), the international animal rights group which documented the now viral video, also echoed their support for the Philippine coconuts farmers and industry.

In a statement, PETA said “Other coconut-growing regions – including the Philipines, India, Brazil, Colombia and Hawaii – harvest coconuts for export using humane methods such as tractor-mounted hydraulic elevators, willing human tree-climbers, rope or platform systems, or ladders. Thailand can easily implement these humane methods, too.” The group also made it clear that “PETA does not want coconut milk or oil to be banned. We only want monkeys to be removed from the coconut-picking process.”

The Department of Environment and Natural Resources, through the office of secretary Roy Cimatu, also assured consumers, animal rights and cause-oriented groups that “the Philippines has high respect for animal rights, hence, (monkey farming) is a practice that is not done, encouraged nor tolerated in our country,’”

While the piece about the money video shot in Thailand created uproar and even calls for international boycott on coconuts sourced from similar animal labor farms, UCAP assures consumers that “the Philippines proudly offers itself as an alternative, ethnically-sourced supplier of coconut products of the highest standards.”

Yearly export earnings of Philippine-harvest coconuts reach up to $2 billion, making the country the number one source of coconuts worldwide.

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Monkey Sneakily Cops Bread From S’pore Shop, Lepaks In The Tree For Teatime

Monkey Spotted Making Away With Bread From Singapore Shop, Clip Goes Viral

Wildlife is thriving in Singapore’s urban jungle. Some days, their antics catch us off guard and we either love or hate them for it.

From otters loitering outside a hospital to a wild pangolin stranded along a busy road, we thought we’ve seen it all.

But a viral clip of a monkey sneakily ‘stealing’ bread from a shop in Singapore shows that we continue to be enthralled by the way animals survive on our little red dot.

The viral clip, posted on Sunday (2 Aug), has garnered 600 shares in an hour.

Monkey quickly makes away with bread

We first see the monkey quietly crawling into the shop, its presence largely unnoticed by everyone inside. Seems like only the person behind the camera caught sight of it.

Source

With a deft motion of its nimble limbs, the monkey copped and made away with a packet of bread in just 3 seconds.

Source

Not knowing what it did was a crime for humans, the monkey then sits at the walkway right outside the shop, fiddling with the bag.

Source

Tries to pry plastic packaging open

Plastic can be a tricky thing to tear apart — an equal struggle to both mankind and animals apparently.

The monkey then decides to take its loot to greater heights, literally. It seems to be enjoying its time lepak-ing in the trees, getting to have bread for teatime.

Source

The location of the incident is unknown, as the clip only came with a caption of 2 words: Hello Police.

Singapore animals continue to charm their way through life

Judging from how fast the monkey ran away with the bread, one may deduce that it was likely hungry, refused to loaf around and started looking for food.

We sure hope that the shop took this monkey business into account, so that staff can account for one missing packet of bread at the end of the day.

Enjoy your teatime snack, little breadwinner.

Featured image from Facebook.

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Monkey steals bread from S’pore supermarket & eats it in front of passers-by

Edit: A reader pointed out that this incident might have occurred near Layar LRT station in Sengkang instead of Punggol. We have updated the article with this information.

Talk about humans and animals co-existing in our city state.

A long-tail macaque, possibly a very hungry one, was spotted stealing bread from a supermarket.

In the video, which was uploaded to Facebook page Kuanyewism, the macaque prowls silently towards a supermarket.

Shelves of bread and cakes can be seen outside the supermarket.

Suddenly, the macaque dashes forward and grabs a load of bread wrapped in plastic. It turned around and ran, bread in mouth.

It then sits down on a pathway, tears open the packet and starts eating.

“Wah so fast!” a male passer-by remarks.

As the cameraman moves closer to the macaque, it proceeds to climb up a tree, perch on a branch and continue eating its bread.

It’s unclear where this was shot but based on the surroundings, it could be somewhere in Sengkang near Layar LRT station.

The NParks advises minimal contact with wild monkeys, including macaques. If you spot one in the open, do not attempt to approach it and do not turn away from it and run.

Remain calm, avoid eye contact, and back off slowly.

You can watch the full video below:

Top image via Kwanyewism/Facebook.

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Second-rower Fergus Lee-Warner says Western Force can get monkey off their backs against Waratahs

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